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Local clinic treats animals with stem cell therapy

November 21st, 2014 by Magortro No comments »

AVON LAKE, OH (WOIO) – When Shannon Goulding’s bloodhound Butler tore a ligament in his knee his entire personality changed.

“He was sedentary, and he wasn’t as active as before,” said Goulding.

Dr. Petti a veterinarianat the Avon Lake Animal Clinic told Goulding, who also works at the clinic, suggested that stem cell therapy could help.

“Watching him walk he looked stiff and uncomfortable,” said Petti.

The therapy was successful. Goulding said after four weeks after the surgery she could see a change the way Butler moved.

Stem cell therapy helps animals suffering from sore knees and joints by using their own fat cells.

“You take them from the patient, you process them, make them active, and then you re inject them into the parts of the animal that are giving them problems,” said Petti.

Petti said Avon Lake Animal Clinic has helped about 15 animals with stem cell therapy and people from all over the country have been calling.

One injection of stem cells can last up to three years, and after that a second injection may be needed.

Stem cell therapy is also an expensive procedure. It ranges from $2,000-2,500, but for Goulding she says seeing Butler run free without pain is worth it.

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Local clinic treats animals with stem cell therapy

Signaling molecule crucial to stem cell reprogramming

November 21st, 2014 by DeradeLaDam No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

20-Nov-2014

Contact: Scott LaFee slafee@ucsd.edu 619-543-5232 University of California – San Diego @UCSanDiego

While investigating a rare genetic disorder, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a ubiquitous signaling molecule is crucial to cellular reprogramming, a finding with significant implications for stem cell-based regenerative medicine, wound repair therapies and potential cancer treatments.

The findings are published in the Nov. 20 online issue of Cell Reports.

Karl Willert, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, and colleagues were attempting to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to create a “disease-in-a-dish” model for focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), a rare inherited disorder caused by mutations in a gene called PORCN. Study co-authors V. Reid Sutton and Ignatia Van den Veyver at Baylor College of Medicine had published the observation that PORCN mutations underlie FDH in humans in 2007.

FDH is characterized by skin abnormalities such as streaks of very thin skin or different shades, clusters of visible veins and wartlike growths. Many individuals with FDH also suffer from hand and foot abnormalities and distinct facial features. The condition is also known as Goltz syndrome after Robert Goltz, who first described it in the 1960s. Goltz spent the last portion of his career as a professor at UC San Diego School of Medicine. He retired in 2004 and passed away earlier this year.

To their surprise, Willert and colleagues discovered that attempts to reprogram FDH fibroblasts or skin cells with the requisite PORCN mutation into iPSCs failed using standard methods, but succeeded when they added WNT proteins – a family of highly conserved signaling molecules that regulate cell-to-cell interactions during embryogenesis.

“WNT signaling is ubiquitous,” said Willert. “Every cell expresses one or more WNT genes and every cell is able to receive WNT signals. Individual cells in a dish can grow and divide without WNT, but in an organism, WNT is critical for cell-cell communication so that cells distinguish themselves from neighbors and thus generate distinct tissues, organs and body parts.”

WNT signaling is also critical in limb regeneration (in some organisms) and tissue repair.

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Signaling molecule crucial to stem cell reprogramming

Pluripotent cells created by nuclear transfer can prompt immune reaction, researchers find

November 21st, 2014 by inDZMTOPaaIJsLDD No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

20-Nov-2014

Contact: Krista Conger kristac@stanford.edu 650-725-5371 Stanford University Medical Center @sumedicine

Mouse cells and tissues created through nuclear transfer can be rejected by the body because of a previously unknown immune response to the cell’s mitochondria, according to a study in mice by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and colleagues in Germany, England and at MIT.

The findings reveal a likely, but surmountable, hurdle if such therapies are ever used in humans, the researchers said.

Stem cell therapies hold vast potential for repairing organs and treating disease. The greatest hope rests on the potential of pluripotent stem cells, which can become nearly any kind of cell in the body. One method of creating pluripotent stem cells is called somatic cell nuclear transfer, and involves taking the nucleus of an adult cell and injecting it into an egg cell from which the nucleus has been removed.

The promise of the SCNT method is that the nucleus of a patient’s skin cell, for example, could be used to create pluripotent cells that might be able to repair a part of that patient’s body. “One attraction of SCNT has always been that the genetic identity of the new pluripotent cell would be the same as the patient’s, since the transplanted nucleus carries the patient’s DNA,” said cardiothoracic surgeon Sonja Schrepfer, MD, PhD, a co-senior author of the study, which will be published online Nov. 20 in Cell Stem Cell.

“The hope has been that this would eliminate the problem of the patient’s immune system attacking the pluripotent cells as foreign tissue, which is a problem with most organs and tissues when they are transplanted from one patient to another,” added Schrepfer, who is a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Cardiovascular Institute. She is also a Heisenberg Professor of the German Research Foundation at the University Heart Center in Hamburg, and at the German Center for Cardiovascular Research.

Possibility of rejection

A dozen years ago, when Irving Weissman, MD, professor of pathology and of developmental biology at Stanford, headed a National Academy of Sciences panel on stem cells, he raised the possibility that the immune system of a patient who received SCNT-derived cells might still react against the cells’ mitochondria, which act as the energy factories for the cell and have their own DNA. This reaction could occur because cells created through SCNT contain mitochondria from the egg donor and not from the patient, and therefore could still look like foreign tissue to the recipient’s immune system, said Weissman, the other co-senior author of the paper. Weissman is the Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research and the director of the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.

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Pluripotent cells created by nuclear transfer can prompt immune reaction, researchers find

ViaCyte to Present at 26th Annual Piper Jaffray Healthcare Conference

November 21st, 2014 by Kerkan No comments »

SAN DIEGO, Nov. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — ViaCyte, Inc., a privately-held regenerative medicine company developing a stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes, today announced …

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ViaCyte to Present at 26th Annual Piper Jaffray Healthcare Conference

Elite Emage Stem Cell Therapy – Video

November 21st, 2014 by IroneypeOpele No comments »



Elite Emage Stem Cell Therapy
Elite Emage Stem Cell Therapy.

By: Elite Emage

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Elite Emage Stem Cell Therapy – Video

Delivering stem cells into heart muscle may enhance cardiac repair and reverse injury

November 19th, 2014 by uhxQqlmzJubwu No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

19-Nov-2014

Contact: Lauren Woods lauren.woods@mountsinai.org 646-634-0869 The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine @mountsinainyc

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL.

“Our discoveries offer insight into the power of stem cells to regenerate damaged muscle after a heart attack,” says lead study author Kenneth Fish, PhD, Director of the Cardiology Laboratory for Translational Research, Cardiovascular Research Center, Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

In the study, Mount Sinai researchers administered stem cell factor (SCF) by gene transfer shortly after inducing heart attacks in pre-clinical models directly into damaged heart tissue to test its regenerative repair response. A novel SCF gene transfer delivery system induced the recruitment and expansion of adult c-Kit positive (cKit+) cardiac stem cells to injury sites that reversed heart attack damage. In addition, the gene therapy improved cardiac function, decreased heart muscle cell death, increased regeneration of heart tissue blood vessels, and reduced the formation of heart tissue scarring.

“It is clear that the expression of the stem cell factor gene results in the generation of specific signals to neighboring cells in the damaged heart resulting in improved outcomes at the molecular, cellular, and organ level,” says Roger J. Hajjar, MD, senior study author and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at Mount Sinai. “Thus, while still in the early stages of investigation, there is evidence that recruiting this small group of stem cells to the heart could be the basis of novel therapies for halting the clinical deterioration in patients with advanced heart failure.”

cKit+ cells are a critical cardiac cytokine, or protein receptor, that bond to stem cell factors. They naturally increase after myocardial infarction and through cell proliferation are involved in cardiac repair.

According to researchers there has been a need for the development of interventional strategies for cardiomyopathy and preventing its progression to heart failure. Heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States, with cardiomyopathy or an enlarged heart from heart attack or poor blood supply due to clogged arteries being the most common causes of the condition. In addition, cardiomyopathy causes a loss of cardiomyocyte cells that control heartbeat, and changes in heart shape, which lead to the heart’s decreased pumping efficiency.

“Our study shows our SCF gene transfer strategy can mobilize a promising adult stem cell type to the damaged region of the heart to improve cardiac pumping function and reduce myocardial infarction sizes resulting in improved cardiac performance and potentially increase long-term survival and improve quality of life in patients at risk of progressing to heart failure,” says Dr. Fish.

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Delivering stem cells into heart muscle may enhance cardiac repair and reverse injury

Delivery of Stem Cells into Heart Muscle After Heart Attack May Enhance Cardiac Repair and Reverse Injury

November 19th, 2014 by sdbodyshops No comments »

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Newswise Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL.

Our discoveries offer insight into the power of stem cells to regenerate damaged muscle after a heart attack, says lead study author Kenneth Fish, PhD, Director of the Cardiology Laboratory for Translational Research, Cardiovascular Research Center, Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

In the study, Mount Sinai researchers administered stem cell factor (SCF) by gene transfer shortly after inducing heart attacks in pre-clinical models directly into damaged heart tissue to test its regenerative repair response. A novel SCF gene transfer delivery system induced the recruitment and expansion of adult c-Kit positive (cKit+) cardiac stem cells to injury sites that reversed heart attack damage. In addition, the gene therapy improved cardiac function, decreased heart muscle cell death, increased regeneration of heart tissue blood vessels, and reduced the formation of heart tissue scarring.

It is clear that the expression of the stem cell factor gene results in the generation of specific signals to neighboring cells in the damaged heart resulting in improved outcomes at the molecular, cellular, and organ level, says Roger J. Hajjar, MD, senior study author and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at Mount Sinai. Thus, while still in the early stages of investigation, there is evidence that recruiting this small group of stem cells to the heart could be the basis of novel therapies for halting the clinical deterioration in patients with advanced heart failure.

cKit+ cells are a critical cardiac cytokine, or protein receptor, that bond to stem cell factors. They naturally increase after myocardial infarction and through cell proliferation are involved in cardiac repair.

According to researchers there has been a need for the development of interventional strategies for cardiomyopathy and preventing its progression to heart failure. Heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States, with cardiomyopathy or an enlarged heart from heart attack or poor blood supply due to clogged arteries being the most common causes of the condition. In addition, cardiomyopathy causes a loss of cardiomyocyte cells that control heartbeat, and changes in heart shape, which lead to the hearts decreased pumping efficiency.

Our study shows our SCF gene transfer strategy can mobilize a promising adult stem cell type to the damaged region of the heart to improve cardiac pumping function and reduce myocardial infarction sizes resulting in improved cardiac performance and potentially increase long-term survival and improve quality of life in patients at risk of progressing to heart failure, says Dr. Fish.

This study adds to the emerging evidence that a small population of adult stem cells can be recruited to the damaged areas of the heart and improve clinical outcomes, says Dr. Hajjar.

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Delivery of Stem Cells into Heart Muscle After Heart Attack May Enhance Cardiac Repair and Reverse Injury

Kilian Before & After Stemlogix Stem Cell Therapy – Video

November 19th, 2014 by diergeexceets No comments »



Kilian Before After Stemlogix Stem Cell Therapy
dog with arthritis treated with autologous stem cells.

By: mark Greenberg

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Kilian Before & After Stemlogix Stem Cell Therapy – Video

Low back, neck, hip, shoulder, and knee arthritis 7 months after stem cell therapy by Adelson – Video

November 19th, 2014 by hmhguhez No comments »



Low back, neck, hip, shoulder, and knee arthritis 7 months after stem cell therapy by Adelson
Spence describes his outcome from his “full-body make-over” by Harry Adelson, N.D.. Seven months ago, Spence had his own bone marrow stem cells injected into his low back, neck, hips, shoulders,…

By: Harry Adelson, N.D.

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Low back, neck, hip, shoulder, and knee arthritis 7 months after stem cell therapy by Adelson – Video

Research and Markets: PharmaSphere: Emerging Biotechnologies – Stem Cell Therapy

November 18th, 2014 by arrorpode No comments »

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Research and Markets: PharmaSphere: Emerging Biotechnologies – Stem Cell Therapy

UCLA Stem Cell Researcher Pioneers Gene Therapy Cure for Children with "Bubble Baby" Disease

November 18th, 2014 by Nayuisa No comments »

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Newswise UCLA stem cell researchers have pioneered a stem cell gene therapy cure for children born with adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), often called Bubble Baby disease, a life-threatening condition that if left untreated can be fatal within the first year of life.

The groundbreaking treatment was developed by renowned stem cell researcher and UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research member Dr. Donald Kohn, whose breakthrough was developed over three decades of research to create a gene therapy that safely restores immune systems in children with ADA-deficient SCID using the patients own cells with no side effects.

To date, 18 children with SCID have been cured of the disease after receiving the stem cell gene therapy in clinical trials at UCLA and the National Institutes of Health.

All of the children with SCID that I have treated in these stem cell clinical trials would have died in a year or less without this gene therapy, instead they are all thriving with fully functioning immune systems said Kohn, a professor of pediatrics and of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics in Life Sciences.

To protect children born with SCID they are kept in isolation, in controlled environments because without an immune system they are extremely vulnerable to illness and infection that could be lethal.

Other current options for treating ADA-deficient SCID are not always optimal or feasible for many children, said Kohn. We can now, for the first time, offer these children and their families a cure, and the chance to live a full healthy life.

Defeating ADA-Deficient SCID: A Game-Changing Approach

Children born with SCID, an inherited immunodeficiency, are generally diagnosed at about six months. They are extremely vulnerable to infectious diseases, and in a child with ADA-deficient SCID even the common cold can prove fatal. The disease causes cells to not create an enzyme called ADA, which is critical for production of the healthy white blood cells that drive a normal, fully-functioning immune system. About 15 percent of all SCID patients are ADA-deficient.

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UCLA Stem Cell Researcher Pioneers Gene Therapy Cure for Children with "Bubble Baby" Disease

NeoStem (NBS) Stock Plummets Today on Disappointing Cardiac Stem-Cell Therapy Data

November 18th, 2014 by ZNOXVzeXuJJkRLt No comments »

NEW YORK (TheStreet) — Shares ofNeoStem (NBS) plummeted 25.52% to $5.05 in late morning trading Tuesdayafter the biotech company announced poor results from a trial of its proprietary cardiac stem-cell therapy NBS10.

NBS10, which used to be called AMR-001, missed two primary endpoints in the study to test the therapy’s efficacy.The stem-cell therapy comesfrom a patient’s own bone marrow and is injected into patients after a heart attack. The stem cells are then supposed to help blood flow and build cardiac muscle.

NeoStem’s trial used non-invasive imaging to monitor blood flow through the heart six months after a one dose of NBS10 or a placebo. The study showed no difference between NBS and placebo, NeoStem said.

Must Read:NeoStem’s Stem Cell Therapy Fails Mid-Stage Heart Attack Study

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NeoStem (NBS) Stock Plummets Today on Disappointing Cardiac Stem-Cell Therapy Data

NeoStem's Stem Cell Therapy Fails Mid-Stage Heart Attack Study

November 18th, 2014 by lisarubinstein No comments »

By: Adam Feuerstein | 11/18/14 – 10:16 AM EST

Inject a cocktail of undifferentiated stem cellsinto a patient who has suffered a heart attack, and days or even weekslater, the stem cells transform into cardiac cells and rebuild the damaged heart muscle. Months later, the patient has a “new” healthy heart.It’s a great story. But so far, the proof remains elusive though not for a lack of trying.

The latest company to fulfill this ambitious scenario is NeoStem (NBS) which presented disappointing (but not surprising) results from a small study of its proprietary cardiac stem-cell therapy NBS10 at the American Heart Association annual meeting Monday. NeoStem tried to put some positive spin on the bad news but shares are down 25% to $5.10.

NBS10, formerly known as AMR-001, is an autologous stem-cell therapy derived from a patient’s own bone marrow. When injected back into patients following a heart attack, the stem cells are supposed torestore blood flow, rebuild damaged cardiac muscle and improve function.

Except in NeoStem’s study, NBS10 fell short on two primary endpoints designed to assess the therapy’s efficacy. The study used non-invasive imaging to assess blood flow through the heart, six months after a single infusion of NBS10 or a placebo. There was no difference between NBS and placebo, NeoStem said.

The study’s other co-primary efficacy endpoint was a measurement of adverse cardiac “MACE” events –defined as cardiovascular death, a repeatheart attack, heart failure hospitalization and coronary revascularization. To date, 17% of patientstreated with NBS10 have suffered a MACE event compared to 19% of patients in the placebo arm — a difference which was not statistically significant.

NeoStem said NBS10 therapy was safe relative to placebo and that no patients treated with the stem cells have died compared to three deaths in the placebo patients. But with only one year of follow up on a small number of patients, any claims about a mortality benefit are clinically meaningless.

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NeoStem's Stem Cell Therapy Fails Mid-Stage Heart Attack Study

UCLA Doctors Hail Potential Cure For Bubble Baby Syndrome

November 18th, 2014 by EMPINANUP No comments »

CBS Los Angeles (con’t)

Affordable Care Act Updates: CBSLA.com/ACA

Health News & Information: CBSLA.com/Health

WESTWOOD (CBSLA.com) Doctors say a groundbreaking stem cell therapy treatment out of UCLA may have cured Bubble Baby syndrome once and for all.

KNX 1070s Brian Ping reports Dr. Donald Kohn has perfected a gene therapy that has now cured 18 children born without an immune system, known as ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

Only weeks after giving birth to fraternal twins in 2012, Alysia and Christian Padilla-Vaccaro found out their daughter Evangelinas immune system was so deficient that she could have no exposure to the outside world.

After enrolling their daughter in Dr. Donald Kohns revolutionary stem cell gene therapy treatment which was nearly three decades in the making doctors extracted stem cells from the bone marrow in Evangelinas hip, then used a modified mouse virus to correct her faulty gene before replacing the marrow.

You hear the words mouse virus and you want to run the other way, said mom Alysia. But they modify it so that its teaching it to do something that they want it to do, which is put something in there that was missing.

Evangelinas new immune system developed without side effects and she is now living a healthy normal life.

Her mother Alysia said while the process was difficult for any mom to go through, it was all worth it.

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UCLA Doctors Hail Potential Cure For Bubble Baby Syndrome

Veteran Actor Darius McCrary from Family Matters Receives Stem Cell Procedures with Dr. Raj in Beverly Hills

November 17th, 2014 by raymgmts No comments »

Beverly Hills, California (PRWEB) November 17, 2014

Veteran television and movie actor Darius McCrary has received a revolutionary stem cell procedure for his painful knee and ankle. The regenerative medicine procedure with stem cells was performed by Dr. Raj, a top orthopedic doctor in Beverly Hills and Los Angeles.

Darius McCrary is well known for his decade long stint on Family Matters as character Eddie Winslow. He won a Best Young Actor Award for this role along with movie roles in both Mississippi Burning and Big Shots. Currently, Darius appears along with Charlie Sheen in the show Anger Management.

While staying in tip top shape for his career, Darius has developed persistent pain in his right knee and ankle. Rather than seek a regular cortisone injection for pain relief or opt for surgery, he desired the ability to repair the joint damage and achieve pain relief. “I couldn’t imagine being immobilized because of injury, so I opted for a stem cell procedure.”

The procedures were performed by Dr. Raj, who is a prominent Beverly Hills orthopedic doctor with extensive experience in regenerative medicine. The procedure consisted of a combination of platelet rich plasma therapy along with amniotic derived stem cell therapy. Anecdotal studies are showing that the stem cell procedures for extremity joints allow patients to achieve pain relief and often avoid the need for potentially risky surgery.

Dr. Raj has performed over 100 stem cell procedures for patients who have degenerative arthritis or sports injuries. “Patients do extremely well with the procedures. Minimal risk and there’s a huge potential upside!”

With an active acting career, Darius McCrary cannot afford to be distracted with chronic pain. “I’m looking forward to getting back in the gym and going hard without this pain,” he stated excitedly. The procedure was filmed and can be seen on Dr. Raj’s Facebook page.

To discuss stem cell procedures at Beverly Hills Orthopedic Institute and how they can benefit, call (310) 247-0466.

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Veteran Actor Darius McCrary from Family Matters Receives Stem Cell Procedures with Dr. Raj in Beverly Hills

Stem Cell Therapy for Labrador Retriever with Ruptured Tendon – Video

November 17th, 2014 by Wrororefsed No comments »



Stem Cell Therapy for Labrador Retriever with Ruptured Tendon
Marc Smith DVM of Natchez Trace Veterinary Services and Pet-Tao Pet Foods explains how he utilizes VetraGenics Stem Cell Therapy to regenerate tissue and heal the tendon.

By: Marc Smith

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Stem Cell Therapy for Labrador Retriever with Ruptured Tendon – Video

Authorized MFIII (MF3) – Cell Placenta Therapy For Anti-Aging

November 16th, 2014 by augzoobax No comments »

You no longer have to be Rich and famous to experience the Profound Healing effects and Intense Revitalizing and Anti-Aging benefits of MFIII (MF3) Live Cell Therapy – the best anti-aging product available in the world! Thanks to Swiss innovation and Technology, this amazing anti-aging product is now available for the first time in 70 years, and some refer to this scientific breakthrough in anti-aging and looking young as the Stem Cell in a Capsule.

Whether you are sick or experiencing chronic fatigue or just seeking the best Anti-aging and Skin Beauty supplement, everyone will benefit from the rejuvenation and regeneration of MFIII of Switzerland Live Cell Therapy. Best of all, it’s acompletely Natural and Safe anti-aging solution, facilitatating and enhancing the body’s ability to heal itself naturally, free from any side effects.

At last, you can feel younger, reduce cellular aging and feel full of vitality, energy, and dynamism in around 3-6 weeks with MFIII Switzerland hi-tech oral supplement formulation. MF III ( MF3) Sheep and Vegetal Placenta helps to awaken dormant cells inside the body, thereby enhancing the expression and function of existing cells, revitalizing and regenerating old and malfunctioning cells. This amazing anti-aging supplement offers what vitamins, minerals, hormones, chemicals and other typical treatments can’t to worn out cells. It facilitates the processes and actual requirements for cellular functioning, mandatory for aged, hurt or sick organs and tissues to fix and regenerate, therefore providing amazing age-defying, health beauty benefits at the very same time.

Cell Treatment (or Live Cell Therapy) was first invented in an injectible form by Swiss surgeon Dr Paul Niehans in 1931. As you’ll soon learn: Cell Therapy is essentially the forerunner of the better-known Human Stem Cell Therapy, which was invented in the 1960s based mostly on the principle of Cell Therapy.

Due to their intense health and beauty benefits but exceedingly high cost, Cell Therapy injections have for a while been a celebrity secret in protecting a young appearance and supporting critical health problems. Pope Pius XII was so happy with the treatment that he inducted Dr Paul Niehans, the deviser of Cell Therapy, into the Papal Academy of Science, making him the successor to the late Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin.

Many celebrities, presidents and members of the Swiss Soccer World Cup team have benefited from Cell Therapy. President Eisenhower, Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and French General De Gaulle received it to maintain their powers of concentration and their physical endurance. Adenauer credited live cell therapy with giving him the energy to guide the Republic of Germany though he was more than ninety years old.

Charlie Chaplin claimed it enabled him to marry again and father kids after age seventy. Exclusive hospitals for the wealthy & famous in Switzerland have administered the Anti-Aging Cell Therapy to both western and oriental celebs, improving and lengthening their vigor and conserving their young appearance and capabilities.

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Authorized MFIII (MF3) – Cell Placenta Therapy For Anti-Aging

Lumbar Disc Stem Cell Therapy Request for Funding – Video

November 15th, 2014 by poontesty No comments »



Lumbar Disc Stem Cell Therapy Request for Funding

By: Connor Malander

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Lumbar Disc Stem Cell Therapy Request for Funding – Video

Tumor suppressor also inhibits key property of stem cells, Stanford researchers say

November 14th, 2014 by RakHienteetam No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

13-Nov-2014

Contact: Krista Conger kristac@stanford.edu 650-725-5371 Stanford University Medical Center @sumedicine

A protein that plays a critical role in preventing the development of many types of human cancers has been shown also to inhibit a vital stem cell property called pluripotency, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Blocking expression of the protein, called retinoblastoma, in mouse cells allowed the researchers to more easily transform them into what are known as induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells. Pluripotent is a term used to describe a cell that is similar to an embryonic stem cell and can become any tissue in the body.

The study provides a direct and unexpected molecular link between cancer and stem cell science through retinoblastoma, or Rb, one of the best known of a class of proteins called tumor suppressors. Although Rb has long been known to control the rate of cell division, the researchers found that it also directly binds and inhibits the expression of genes involved in pluripotency.

“We were very surprised to see that retinoblastoma directly connects control of the cell cycle with pluripotency,” said Julien Sage, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics and of genetics. “This is a completely new idea as to how retinoblastoma functions. It physically prevents the reacquisition of stem cellness and pluripotency by inhibiting gene expression.”

Marius Wernig, MD, associate professor of pathology, said, “The loss of Rb appears to directly change a cell’s identity. Without the protein, the cell is much more developmentally fluid and is easier to reprogram into an iPS cell.”

Wernig and Sage, both members of the Stanford Cancer Institute, share senior authorship of the study, which will be published online Nov. 13 in Cell Stem Cell. Postdoctoral scholar Michael Kareta, PhD, is the lead author.

Tumor Suppressor

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Tumor suppressor also inhibits key property of stem cells, Stanford researchers say

UCLA Researchers Identify Unique Protein Key to the Development of Blood Stem Cells

November 14th, 2014 by Herbenrivione No comments »

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Newswise Led by Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research member Dr. Hanna Mikkola, UCLA scientists have discovered a unique protein that is integral to the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during human development.

This discovery lays the groundwork for researchers to generate HSCs in the lab (in vitro) that better mirror those that develop in their natural environment (in vivo). This could lead to improved therapies for blood-related diseases and cancers by enabling the creation of patient-specific blood stem cells for transplantation.

The findings are reported online November 13, 2014, ahead of print in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

The research community has long sought to harness the promise of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to overcome a significant roadblock in making cell-based therapies blood and immune diseases more broadly available, which has been hampered by the inability to generate and expand human HSCs in culture. HSCs are the blood forming cells that serve as the critical link between PSCs and fully differentiated cells of the blood system. The ability of HSCs to self-renew (replicate themselves) and differentiate to all blood cell types, is determined in part by the environment that the stem cell came from, called the niche.

In the five-year study, Mikkola and Drs. Sacha Prashad and Vincenzo Calvanese, members of Mikkolas lab and lead authors of the study, investigated a unique HSC surface protein called GPI-80. They found that it was produced by a specific subpopulation of human fetal hematopoietic cells that were the only group that could self-renew and differentiate into various blood cell types. They also found that this subpopulation of hematopoietic cells was the sole population able to permanently integrate into and thrive within the blood system of a recipient mouse.

Mikkola and colleagues further discovered that GPI-80 identifies HSCs during multiple phases of human HSC development and migration. These include the early first trimester of fetal development when newly generated HSCs can be found in the placenta, and the second trimester when HSCs are actively replicating in the fetal liver and the fetal bone marrow.

We found that whatever HSC niche we investigated, we could use GPI-80 as the best determinant to find the stem cell as it was being generated or colonized different hematopoietic tissues, said Mikkola, associate professor of molecular, cell and development biology at UCLA and also a member of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Moreover, loss of GPI-80 caused the stem cells to differentiate. This essentially tells us that GPI-80 must be present to make HSCs. We now have a very unique marker for investigating how human hematopoietic cells develop, migrate and function.

Mikkolas team is actively exploring different stages of human HSC development and PSC differentiation based on the GPI-80 marker, and comparing how blood stem cells are being generated in vitro and in vivo. This paves the way for scientists to redirect PSCs into patient-specific HSCs for transplantation into the patient without the need to find a suitable donor.

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UCLA Researchers Identify Unique Protein Key to the Development of Blood Stem Cells