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Rehabilitation | Pet Stem Cell Therapy

October 22nd, 2014 by Mernaineeclaibe No comments »

Can brain damage caused during birth be ever reversed? Is it possible to repair the damaged brain tissues among children, who suffer from Cerebral Palsy (CP)?

So far, the treatment option for CP is to manage the symptoms of the ailment. However, in recent times, scientists and researchers worldwide have started to explore stem cell therapy as a potential treatment option for CP patients.

Can stem cells reverse the brain damage, which is the sole cause for CP among children? Our research on over 100 CP patients and stem cell therapy has been very encouraging. The patients, who underwent stem cell therapy, have displayed huge improvement in CP symptoms, says Professor and Head of Neurosurgery, LTM Medical College, Mumbai, Alok Sharma.

The neurosurgeon, who is taking part in an international conference on CP in Hyderabad this weekend, said that doctors are not concentrating on treating the brain damage.

The current treatment options available to help patients are only to mange symptoms and nobody tries to repair the underlying damage to the brain tissue. Therefore, developing a standard therapeutic approach for CP through stem cells is the need of the hour, he said.

The results from the stem cell therapy on CP patients conducted by Dr. Aloks team were recently published in Neurogens chapter on Stem cell therapy for cerebral palsy A Novel Option in a book titled Cerebral Palsy Challenges For the Future. According to the neurosurgeon, the patients after therapy had improvements in their speech, balance, upper and lower limb activity and movement.

While for stem cell research, many prefer cord blood banking, Dr. Alok pointed out that they have used stem cells from the adults derived from the bone marrow. The transplanted stem cells have the ability to migrate to the area of the damaged tissue in the brain and home-in on those affected areas to help repair the damage. Stem cells release substance that stimulates natural growth, which decreases the process of damage of the brain, Dr. Alok explained.

The researcher, who has started NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute in Mumbai to conduct stem cell research, pointed out that stem cell therapy and other rehabilitation programmes should be encouraged for the benefit of CP patients. The positive changes that we recorded in our patients were not just restricted to their symptoms but also constructive change in brain metabolism observed through PET-CT scans, he explained. Dr. Alok Sharma can be reached at: alok276@gmail.com

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Rehabilitation | Pet Stem Cell Therapy

Stem cell and clinical research advances to be presented at NYSCF's Ninth Annual Conference

October 22nd, 2014 by exollacoemn No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

20-Oct-2014

Contact: David McKeon 212-365-7440 New York Stem Cell Foundation @nyscf

Leaders in translational stem cell research from around the world will present the latest advances in stem cell science that are leading to better treatments and cures to disease and injury at The New York Stem Cell Foundation’s Ninth Annual Translational Stem Cell Research Conference.

The opening day of the conference includes a panel discussion on large scale, big data stem cell and genetic initiatives moderated by Susan L. Solomon, JD, CEO and Co-founder of The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), with panelists George Church, PhD, Harvard Medical School; John Greally, PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Scott Noggle, PhD, The NYSCF Research Institute; and Eric Schadt, PhD, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Later that day, a discussion on neurodegeneration includes Kevin Eggan, PhD, Harvard University and the NYSCF Research Institute, who will discuss his research identifying an existing drug candidate that may be of use treating ALS and is entering clinical trials in the coming year. The following session on cell reprogramming and cancer includes Michael Milone, MD, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, who will discuss recent research results from his lab and his colleagues including the results of a clinical trial for leukemia featured in The New York Times last week. The first day closes with a conversation on personalized medicine featuring Dieter Egli, PhD, NYSCF Robertson Investigator at the NYSCF Research Institute and Columbia University; Rudolf Jaenisch, MD, The Whitehead Institute; and Sir Ian Wilmut, FRS, FRSE, University of Edinburgh.

On October 23, the day will begin with remarks by Kenneth Adams and Kyle Kimball, President of the Empire State Development Corporation and President of the New York City Economic Development Corporation, respectively. The session on translating innovation from the laboratory to the clinic features Stephen Chang, PhD, of the NYSCF Research Institute and Richard Pearse, PhD, of the Harvard Catalyst and eagle-i Network who will discuss their collaboration on the first publicly available induced pluripotent stem cell database. The day will close with a presentation on induced neuronal cells and cell transdifferentiation from the 2014 NYSCF Robertson Stem Cell Prize recipient, Marius Wernig, MD, PhD, of Stanford University School of Medicine.

Sir Ian Wilmut will give the keynote address on October 22nd and Dr. Rudolf Jaenisch will give the keynote address on the last day of the conference.

The full conference agenda can be found at http://www.nyscf.org/conference

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Stem cell and clinical research advances to be presented at NYSCF's Ninth Annual Conference

Stem Cell Hair Therapy – Hair Regrowth Treatment using Adult Stem Cell from Luminesce – Video

October 22nd, 2014 by FaumsFape No comments »



Stem Cell Hair Therapy – Hair Regrowth Treatment using Adult Stem Cell from Luminesce
Do It Yourself – Stem Cell Hair Therapy : http://placesiana.com/stem-cell-hair-loss-therapy Imagine becoming a healthier, much younger, better looking you? Infused with a potent growth factor…

By: Sam Jeunesse

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Stem Cell Hair Therapy – Hair Regrowth Treatment using Adult Stem Cell from Luminesce – Video

StemGenex New Clinical Study Aims to Provide Relief to Osteoarthritis Patients through Latest Stem Cell Therapy

October 22nd, 2014 by butipce1975 No comments »

La Jolla, CA (PRWEB) October 21, 2014

StemGenex, the leading resource for adult adipose stem cell therapy in the US aimed at improving the lives of patients dealing with degenerative diseases today announced their newest clinical study in partnership with Stem Cell Research Centre for Osteoarthritis. StemGenex and Stem Cell Research Centre (SCRC) believe that a commitment to the safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy are paramount when providing care to patients with life threatening diseases.

There are currently 21 million people in the U.S. alone, who suffer from Osteoarthritis. The most common symptoms are joint pain and stiffness which most commonly affect the neck, lower back, knees, shoulders and hips. These symptoms gradually worsen over time ultimately leading to the need for a total joint replacement procedure. StemGenex believe their new clinical study may provide patients improved mobility, significantly reduced pain and ultimately a better quality of life without needing joint replacement surgery.

This clinical study makes stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis accessible to the millions of individuals currently struggling with this painful disease. The protocol used in these stem cell treatments is unique to StemGenex and SCRC, having the possibility of being more effective than other stem cell treatments currently available. These treatments will utilize a multiple administration method which also includes injections precisely targeting the joint space. StemGenex believes these treatments may be able to keep patients from needing joint replacement surgery in the future, due to regeneration of cartilage in the joint.

This clinical study will be conducted under the leadership of the principal investigator,Dr. Jeremiah McDole, Ph.D. Dr. McDole states, We are excited to begin enrolling for this new study. We have high expectations for what we will learn and what advancements can ultimately be implemented. Of course, our focus is always set toward the near future and what can be done to help improve the lives of those individuals with Osteoarthritis.

This study is registered through The National Institutes of Health which can be found at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov and is being conducted under IRB approval of Stem Cell Research Centre (SCRC). There are many patients who are exploring stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis and it is important they have access to top-tier stem cell therapy. By providing patients access to stem cell studies registered through The National Institutes of Health, patients now have the ability to choose treatment that focuses on both safety and efficacy.

Rita Alexander, founder and president of StemGenex stated With so many people suffering from Osteoarthritis its absolutely wonderful to provide a treatment that has not only shown efficacy but also to be minimally invasive. Over the last several years we have observed significant improvement in the symptoms of Osteoarthritis patients through stem cell treatment. Through these registered clinical studies, we will now be able to publish our findings over the next few years.

This clinical study follows on the heels of StemGenex latest clinical studies for both Parkinsons disease and Multiple Sclerosis. Stem cell treatment studies are currently being offered by StemGenex partnering with Stem Cell Research Centre (SCRC) to patients diagnosed with Osteoarthritis as well as degenerative neurological diseases. StemGenex takes a unique approach of compassion and empowerment while providing access to the latest stem cell therapies for degenerative conditions including Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimers disease, stroke recovery and others.

To find out more about stem cell therapy, contact StemGenex either by phone at (800) 609-7795 or email Contact@stemgenex.com

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StemGenex New Clinical Study Aims to Provide Relief to Osteoarthritis Patients through Latest Stem Cell Therapy

Stem Cell Treatment | Multiple Sclerosis | www.stemrx.in – Video

October 21st, 2014 by 2012 end of the world No comments »



Stem Cell Treatment | Multiple Sclerosis | http://www.stemrx.in
Multiple sclerosis (MS), also known as disseminated sclerosis or encephalomyelitis disseminata, is an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of …

By: StemRx BioScience

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Stem Cell Treatment | Multiple Sclerosis | http://www.stemrx.in – Video

Cascade Veterinary Referral Center Seeks Candidates for an Investigational Study of Stem Cells for Dogs with Arthritis

October 21st, 2014 by may627 No comments »

Tigard, OR (PRWEB) October 20, 2014

Local veterinary surgeon, Dr. Tim McCarthy is seeking candidates to participate in an investigational study of donor stem cells for dogs with osteoarthritis. Dr. McCarthy has lectured nationally in stem cell therapy and has performed clinical stem cell therapy for 7 years. The ultimate goal of this study is to determine if a single injection of donor stem cells into one or two arthritically affected joints can help reduce pain and inflammation in the treated joints.

Candidates for the current investigational study must be older than nine months, weigh more than five and a half pounds, have osteoarthritis of only one or two leg joints, have had pain or lameness for at least three months, and must not have cancer. Joints that will be included in the study and injected under anesthesia include hips, stifles, shoulders, and elbows. Dogs that may be considered must be in good health and undergo a diagnostic work up before qualifying for the study.

Dr. McCarthy and his team coordinate directly with your veterinarian to provide the most advanced veterinary care available. Cascade Veterinary Referral Center is a locally owned, state-of-the-art veterinary hospital staffed by a highly-skilled team of veterinarians, technicians and client care coordinators. They are committed to providing high-quality care for you and your pet. In 2007 Dr. McCarthy was credentialed with Vet-Stem, Inc. in the use of Regenerative Veterinary Medicine for arthritis and ligament and tendon injuries. For information about the study, please contact Angie Dutcher at (503) 684-1800

About Vet-Stem, Inc. Since its formation in 2002, Vet-Stem, Inc. has endeavored to improve the lives of animals through regenerative medicine. As the first company in the United States to provide an adipose-derived stem cell service to veterinarians for their patients, Vet-Stem pioneered the use of regenerative stem cells for horses, dogs, and cats. In 2004 the first horse was treated with Vet-Stem Regenerative Cell Therapy. Ten years later Vet-Stem celebrated its 10,000th animal treated. As animal advocates, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and cell biologists, the team at Vet-Stem tasks themselves with the responsibility of discovering, refining, and bringing to market innovative medical therapies that utilize the bodys own healing and regenerative cells.

Contact: Sue Harman Senior Manager, Clinical Trials Vet-Stem, Inc. 12860 Danielson Court, Suite B Poway, CA 92064 858-748-2004 sharman(at)vet-stem(dot)com

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Cascade Veterinary Referral Center Seeks Candidates for an Investigational Study of Stem Cells for Dogs with Arthritis

what conditions can be treated using Autologous Adult stem cell therapy? – Video

October 21st, 2014 by Aluslyinilt No comments »



what conditions can be treated using Autologous Adult stem cell therapy?
Conditions that Respond to Chronic Debilitating Diseases.

By: StemCellsGroup

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what conditions can be treated using Autologous Adult stem cell therapy? – Video

What is stem celll therapy? – Video

October 21st, 2014 by dueplalge No comments »



What is stem celll therapy?
Renowned scientist Kristin Comella discussing latest advancements in Stem Cell Therapy.

By: StemCellsGroup

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What is stem celll therapy? – Video

How is stem cell therapy performed? – Video

October 21st, 2014 by Christian Louboutin No comments »



How is stem cell therapy performed?
Stem Cell Scientist Kristin Comella discussing Cell Therapy Procedures.

By: StemCellsGroup

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How is stem cell therapy performed? – Video

FranchiseStemcell Fat Stem Cell Therapy Anti Aging – Video

October 20th, 2014 by Avtomoto No comments »



FranchiseStemcell Fat Stem Cell Therapy Anti Aging
Fat Stem Cell Therapy Anti Aging .

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FranchiseStemcell Fat Stem Cell Therapy Anti Aging – Video

Dr Charles Krome Stem Cell Therapy – Video

October 19th, 2014 by rodykowdelljr No comments »



Dr Charles Krome Stem Cell Therapy
This video is about Dr Charles Krome Stem Cell Therapy.

By: John lore

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Dr Charles Krome Stem Cell Therapy – Video

Stem cell, regenerative medicine policies to be discussed at Rice's Baker Institute

October 17th, 2014 by uILEocbdAOByWjG No comments »

Dr. Deepak Srivastava, a leading biomedical research policy expert, will discuss “Stem Cells, Regenerative Medicine and Policy Impediments to the New Future” at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy Oct. 21. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Who: Dr. Deepak Srivastava, the Baker Institute’s nonresident scholar for biomedical research policy and the Younger Family Director and senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease.

Neal Lane, the Malcolm Gillis University Professor, senior fellow in science and technology policy at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy and a professor of physics and astronomy, will give introductory remarks.

Stem cells and regenerative medicine are exciting and emerging fields of biomedical research, according to event organizers. Proposed applications include treating conditions such as blindness, diabetes and heart disease. Regenerative medicine could also help heal failing organ systems and replace damaged tissue. While these fields hold great promise for medicine, external factors limit and, in some cases, stall research, organizers said. Ethical controversies surrounding human embryonic stem cells, policy issues affecting federal and state funding and regulation, and economic pressures all play a role in determining the future of research.

In his presentation, Srivastava will explore the current and future potential of stem cells and regenerative medicine. Following the presentation, he will discuss policy challenges and opportunities with Lane.

The event is sponsored by the Baker Institute’s Science and Technology Policy Program and the Health Policy Forum.

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Stem cell, regenerative medicine policies to be discussed at Rice's Baker Institute

Shannon Layne, DVM and VCA Dunmore Animal Hospital Now Offer Stem Cell Therapy to Pet Patients in Pain

October 17th, 2014 by thorrooferodinz No comments »

Dunmore, Pennsylvania (PRWEB) October 17, 2014

VCA Dunmore Animal Hospital is proud to announce the addition of Shannon Layne, DVM and her interest in stem cell therapy to their team. Credentialed in Regenerative Cell Therapy with Vet-Stem since January of 2011, Dr. Layne has proudly been treating pets with osteoarthritis and ligament injuries in north-east Pennsylvania with stem cell therapy for the last four years.

Dr. Layne graduated from North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine in 2010 and has taken a special interest in Regenerative Veterinary Medicine and stem cell therapy since. In contrast to widely used drug therapies for pain management, cell-based therapies (like stem cell therapy) can promote healing, reduce inflammation, and decrease pain. Dr Layne also offers traditional Chinese veterinary medicine including acupuncture and Chinese herbs if clients are interested in a more holistic approach.

Stem cells are regenerative cells that can differentiate into many tissue types (reducing pain and inflammation) thus helping to restore range of motion and regenerate tendon, ligament and joint tissues (Vet-Stem.com/science). In a study using Vet-Stem Regenerative Cell Therapy on dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joint it was found that regenerative cell therapy (adipose-derived stem cells) decreases patient discomfort and increases patient functional ability.

Once Dr. Layne has identified a patient as a good candidate for stem cell therapy the procedure begins with a fatty tissue collection from the patient. The tissue sample is sent overnight to Vet-Stems lab in California for processing. Once processed the stem cells are extracted and fresh, injectable doses of the patients stem cells are sent overnight, back to Dr. Layne at VCA Dunmore Animal Hospital. Within 48hrs of collecting a fat sample from a patient Dr. Layne is able to inject stem cells into (arthritic or injured) affected areas and regeneration and healing can begin.

At VCA Dunmore Animal Hospital Dr. Layne will be practicing in an 8,800 square foot, state of the art facility that includes two extensive surgery suites. For more information on VCA Dunmore Animal Hospital please visit their website at http://www.vcahospitals.com/dunmore.

About Vet-Stem, Inc.

Since its formation in 2002, Vet-Stem, Inc. has endeavored to improve the lives of animals through regenerative medicine. As the first company in the United States to provide an adipose-derived stem cell service to veterinarians for their patients, Vet-Stem pioneered the use of regenerative stem cells for horses, dogs, cats, and some exotics. In 2004 the first horse was treated with Vet-Stem Regenerative Cell Therapy for a tendon injury that would normally have been career ending. Ten years later Vet-Stem celebrated its 10,000th animal treated, and the success of establishing stem cell therapy as a regenerative medicine for certain inflammatory, degenerative, and arthritic diseases. As animal advocates, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and cell biologists, the team at Vet-Stem tasks themselves with the responsibility of discovering, refining, and bringing to market innovative medical therapies that utilize the bodys own healing and regenerative cells.

For more information about Vet-Stem and Regenerative Veterinary Medicine visit http://www.vet-stem.com or call 858-748-2004.

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Shannon Layne, DVM and VCA Dunmore Animal Hospital Now Offer Stem Cell Therapy to Pet Patients in Pain

Scientists identify "nave-like" human stem cell

October 16th, 2014 by kumotras No comments »

3 hours ago by Vicky Just Naive-like stem cells could potentially be used to treat dementia or reduce organ transplants

Scientists from our university and Berlin have identified a type of human stem cell that appears to be “nave-like” able to develop into any type of cell. The discovery of this cell type could potentially have a large impact on our understanding of how humans develop and on the field of regenerative medicine.

The human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that scientists currently study in the lab are able to develop into several different types of cell but are already pre-determined to some extent.

Published in the top scientific journal Nature, researchers from the Max Delbrck Centre for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Berlin, Germany and our university have for the first time discovered human ESCs that appear to behave like “nave” cells able to develop into any type of cell.

These nave-like cells, only previously found in mice, are easy to grow in the lab and could have huge potential for regenerating damaged tissues in the body, potentially leading to treatments for diseases such as dementia or reducing the need for organ transplantation.

Professor Laurence Hurst from our Department of Biology & Biochemistry and a co-author of the study explained: “Most stem cells are primed to some extent to become a certain type of cell. If you use the analogy of a train network, these cells are like one of the main London stations. Trains from Paddington can go to Cardiff or Exeter, but not to Norwich. In the same way, these cells can develop into a fixed number of different cell types.

“However the nave-like cells we’ve identified are like a central terminus; they are present earlier in the embryo’s development and so we think their fates can go in any direction and become any type of cell.”

Co-investigator Dr Zsuzsanna Izsvk, (MDC, corresponding author) said: “We were very excited by this discovery it was one of those Eureka moments that rarely happens in science.”

The Bath and Berlin team found the nave-like cells by looking at which genes were expressed in very early human embryos. They pinpointed a virus called human endogenous retrovirus H (HERVH) that has become integrated into human DNA and was very highly expressed at just the right time and place in human embryos, where they would expect to see nave-like cells if they existed.

They identified a protein called LBP9, which is essential for the activity of HERVH in early embryos. Using a reporter system that made cells expressing HERVH via LBP9 glow green, the Berlin and our team found that they had purified cells that showed all of the hallmarks of a mouse nave cell.

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Scientists identify "nave-like" human stem cell

Pitt/McGowan Institute team discovers stem cells in the esophagus

October 16th, 2014 by kojhlmrbte No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

16-Oct-2014

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran SrikamAV@upmc.edu 412-578-9193 University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences @UPMCnews

PITTSBURGH, Oct. 16, 2014 Despite previous indications to the contrary, the esophagus does have its own pool of stem cells, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an animal study published online today in Cell Reports. The findings could lead to new insights into the development and treatment of esophageal cancer and the precancerous condition known as Barrett’s esophagus.

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 18,000 people will be diagnosed with esophageal cancer in the U.S. in 2014 and almost 15,500 people will die from it. In Barrett’s esophagus, the lining of the esophagus changes for unknown reasons to resemble that of the intestine, though gastro-esophageal reflux disease or GERD is a risk factor for its development.

“The esophageal lining must renew regularly as cells slough off into the gastrointestinal tract,” said senior investigator Eric Lagasse, Pharm.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pathology, Pitt School of Medicine, and director of the Cancer Stem Cell Center at the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine. “To do that, cells in the deeper layers of the esophagus divide about twice a week to produce daughter cells that become the specialized cells of the lining. Until now, we haven’t been able to determine whether all the cells in the deeper layers are the same or if there is a subpopulation of stem cells there.”

The research team grew pieces or “organoids” of esophageal tissue from mouse samples, and then conducted experiments to identify and track the different cells in the basal layer of the tissue. They found a small population of cells that divide more slowly, are more primitive, can generate specialized or differentiated cells, and have the ability to self-renew, which is a defining trait of stem cells.

“It was thought that there were no stem cells in the esophagus because all the cells were dividing rather than resting or quiescent, which is more typical of stem cells,” Dr. Lagasse noted. “Our findings reveal that there indeed are esophageal stem cells, and rather than being quiescent, they divide slowly compared to the rest of the deeper layer cells.”

In future work, the researchers will examine human esophageal tissues for evidence of stem cell dysfunction in Barrett’s esophagus disease.

“Some scientists have speculated that abnormalities of esophageal stem cells could be the origin of the tissue changes that occur in Barrett’s disease,” Dr. Lagasse said. “Our current and future studies could make it possible to test this long-standing hypothesis.”

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Pitt/McGowan Institute team discovers stem cells in the esophagus

Knee arthritis 2.5 years after stem cell therapy by Harry Adelson, N.D. – Video

October 16th, 2014 by MTvbqjPa No comments »



Knee arthritis 2.5 years after stem cell therapy by Harry Adelson, N.D.
Janet discusses her outcome three and a half years after bone marrow stem cell therapy by Dr Harry Adelson for her arthritic knees http://www.docereclinics.com.

By: Harry Adelson, N.D.

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Knee arthritis 2.5 years after stem cell therapy by Harry Adelson, N.D. – Video

Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy Shows Long-Term Effectiveness, Safety

October 16th, 2014 by Brurljart No comments »

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) — A new study is the first to show the long-term safety of embryonic stem cell transplants to treat human disease.

The research involved 18 people who received the transplants to treat forms of macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss.

The transplants, which restored some sight in more than half of the patients, appeared safe up to three years after the procedure.

The study, funded by a U.S.-based company called Advanced Cell Technology, was published Oct. 14 in The Lancet.

“Embryonic stem cells have the potential to become any cell type in the body, but transplantation has been complicated by problems,” lead author Dr. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology, said in a journal news release. Those problems include the rejection of the transplanted cells by the patient’s immune system, as well as the danger that the cells might spur certain types of cancers called teratomas.

A teratoma is a type of cancer that occurs when stem cells develop into multiple types of cells and form incompatible tissues that can include teeth and hair.

As Lanza explained, because of these issues, scientists interested in embryonic stem cell therapy have tended to focused on sites in the body that typically do not produce a strong immune response. The eye is one such spot.

In the new study, human embryonic stem cells were first prompted to develop into eye cells called retinal pigment epithelial cells. They were then transplanted into nine people with Stargardt’s macular dystrophy, and another nine with dry atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

Patient outcomes were tracked for up to three years after transplant. No signs of either cancer-like cell growth (hyperproliferation) or immune system rejection were found in any of the treated eyes after a median follow-up of 22 months, and the only adverse events were linked not to the transplanted cells, but to the eye surgery or immune system suppression needed for the transplant.

Overall, 10 of the 18 patients said they had significant improvements in their vision, and this improvement was only seen in the eyes that had received the stem cell treatment.

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Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy Shows Long-Term Effectiveness, Safety

Penn Medicine researcher receives New Innovator Award from National Institutes of Health

October 15th, 2014 by EWRichard No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

13-Oct-2014

Contact: Karen Kreeger karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu 215-349-5658 University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine @PennMedNews

PHILADELPHIA Roberto Bonasio, PhD, an assistant professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a core member of the Penn Epigenetics Program is one of the recipients of a 2014 New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, totaling $1.5 million over five years for each of the 50 recipients this year, supports highly innovative research and creative, new investigators who exhibit strong potential to make great advances on a critical biomedical or behavioral research problem. The initiative, established in 2007, supports investigators who are within 10 years of their terminal degree or clinical residency, who have not yet received a research project grant (R01), or equivalent NIH grant, to conduct unusually innovative research.

Bonasio studies the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic memory, which are key to a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, cancer, stem cell pluripotency, and brain function. In particular, he will be looking at gene expression controlled by epigenetic pathways that alter the chemical structure of chromosomes and allow for multiple cell identities to arise from a single genome. These pathways are also critical in the brain and their improper functioning can cause mental retardation, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders.

Bonasio has chosen ants as a model system. With colleagues Shelley Berger, PhD, who directs the Penn Epigenetics program; postdoctoral mentor Danny Reinberg, PhD, New York University; and Jrgen Liebig, PhD, Arizona State University, Bonasio has established the ant Harpegnathos saltator as a laboratory model to study epigenetics, the process by which a single genome gives rise to a variety of physiological outcomes.

This phenomenon is particularly evident in ants, as they live in caste-based societies in which most of the individuals are sterile females, limited to highly specialized roles such as workers and soldiers. Only one queen and the relatively small contingent of male ants are fertile and able to reproduce. Yet despite such extreme differences in behavior and physical form, all females within the colony appear to be genetically identical.

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Also see the University of Pennsylvania release.

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Penn Medicine researcher receives New Innovator Award from National Institutes of Health

Stem cell discovery challenges dogma on how fetus develops; holds insights for liver cancer and reg

October 15th, 2014 by ArguesyAccoug No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

14-Oct-2014

Contact: Greg Williams newsmedia@mssm.edu 212-241-9200 The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine @mountsinainyc

A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The existence of such a cell type contradicts current theory on how organs arise from cell layers in the embryo, and may hold clues to origins of, and future treatment for, liver cancer.

Thanks to stem cells, humans develop from a single cell into a complex being made up of more than 200 cell types. The original, single human stem cell, the fertilized embryo, has the potential to develop into every kind of human cell. Stem cells multiply (proliferate) and specialize (differentiate) until millions of functional cells result, including liver cells (hepatocytes), blood vessel cells (endothelial cells), muscle cells, bone cells, etc.

In the womb, the human embryo early on becomes three “germ” layers of stem cells the endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. The long-held consensus was that the endoderm goes on to form the liver and other gut organs; the mesoderm the heart, muscles and blood cells; and the ectoderm the brain and skin. Researchers have sought to determine the germ layer that yields each organ because these origins hold clues to healthy function and disease mechanisms in adults.

“We found a stem cell that can become either a liver cell, which is thought to originate in the endoderm, or an endothelial cell that helps to from a blood vessel, which was thought to derive from the mesoderm,” said Valerie Gouon-Evans, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology and Black Family Stem Cell Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and lead author for the study. “Our results go against traditional germ layer theory, which holds that a stem cell can only go on to become cell types in line with the germ layer that stem cell came from. Endothelial cells may arise from both the endoderm and mesoderm.”

Cell Growth Plusses and Minuses

Beyond the womb, many human organs contain pools of partially differentiated stem cells, which are ready to differentiate into specific replacement cells as needed. Among these are stem cells that “know” they are liver cells, but have enough “stemness” to become more than one cell type.

By advancing the understanding of stem cell processes in the liver, the study offers insights into mechanisms that drive liver cancer. The rapid growth seen in cells as the fetal liver develops is similar in some ways to the growth seen in tumors. Among the factors that make both possible is the building of blood vessels that supply nutrients and oxygen.

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Stem cell discovery challenges dogma on how fetus develops; holds insights for liver cancer and reg

The 1st Meeting of the Series Bridging Biomedical Worlds: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities for Stem Cell Therapy

October 15th, 2014 by Desentele No comments »

Stem cells hold great promise for treating a variety of human diseases and injuries. Basic and translational stem cell research is among the most competitive fields in the life sciences.

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The 1st Meeting of the Series Bridging Biomedical Worlds: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities for Stem Cell Therapy