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Cell Separation Technologies Market (Technology: Gradient Centrifugation, MACS and FACS; Application: Stem Cell …

October 29th, 2014 by grisruffity No comments »

LONDON, Oct. 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — This report consists of the market analysis for the various technologies used in the cell separation market. Increasing cell therapy oriented research and development …

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Cell Separation Technologies Market (Technology: Gradient Centrifugation, MACS and FACS; Application: Stem Cell …

ViaCyte's VC-01 Investigational Stem Cell-Derived Islet Replacement Therapy Successfully Implanted into First Patient

October 29th, 2014 by Artist No comments »

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — ViaCyte, Inc., a privately-held regenerative medicine company, announced today that the first patient in its Phase 1/2 study was successfully implanted with VC-01, its embryonic stem cell-derived islet replacement product candidate being developed as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. This Phase 1/2 clinical trial, designed to evaluate the VC-01 product …

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ViaCyte's VC-01 Investigational Stem Cell-Derived Islet Replacement Therapy Successfully Implanted into First Patient

Medical groups call for major stem cell investment from public, private sector

October 29th, 2014 by Linssurse No comments »

OTTAWA – A coalition of Canadian stem cell advocates, researchers and charities is calling for $1.5 billion in private and public funding for stem cell therapy over the next 10 years.

The coalition’s action plan is aimed at cementing Canada’s reputation as a stem cell leader, one that uses stem cell science to reduce suffering and death from cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, vision loss, spinal cord injuries and other conditions.

James Price, the president and CEO of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation, says the action plan could help millions of people with new, life-changing therapies.

The action plan’s call for funding includes a $50 million scaled annual average commitment by the federal government.

The Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine estimates the action plan could also create more than 12,000 jobs due to the growth of existing companies and the development of new enterprises aimed at global markets.

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Medical groups call for major stem cell investment from public, private sector

UWA scientist Ryan Lister wins Prime Minister's prize for life science

October 29th, 2014 by Bibikt No comments »

Professor Ryan Lister says he is humbled by the award.

A scientist from the University of WA says he is humbled to be awarded the Prime Minister’s prize for life science.

Professor Ryan Lister researches epigenomes – the chemical compounds surrounding DNA – and is one of six people to receive a prize for science from Prime Minister Tony Abbott in Canberra.

Professor Lister has mapped how genes are turned on and off, revealing why a leaf cell is different from a root cell or a stem cell different from a skin cell.

He said he hoped his research could be used to improve the understanding of the human brain, transform stem-cell medicine and advance agriculture.

“We need to be able to understand how the different cell types of our bodies form and how they form in healthy states, so that we can understand why they might be disturbed in various disease states,” Professor Lister said.

He said the epigenome played a pivotal role in normal development and disease or stress states in humans, animals and plants.

“What we’ve been able to do is create the first maps of how the brain epigenome changes during development,” he said.

“What this will allow us to do in the future is to look at a range of neurological disorders to see whether these chemical signposts added to the DNA are changed or disturbed or altered within these various disease states.

“We’re also researching how the epigenome might affect plant development and the growth and health of crops.

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UWA scientist Ryan Lister wins Prime Minister's prize for life science

Copy of PhytoScience Philippines Celeb Share good effect of Stem Cell Therapy – Video

October 29th, 2014 by GenDaLFF No comments »



Copy of PhytoScience Philippines Celeb Share good effect of Stem Cell Therapy
PHYTOSCIENCE DOUBLE STEM CELL removes the apperance of age lines and restore smoth, radiant, youthful looking skin! LOOK YOUNGER REDUCE THE LOOK OF WRINKLES LINES …

By: Emmanuel Villamor Jr

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Copy of PhytoScience Philippines Celeb Share good effect of Stem Cell Therapy – Video

The Miracle of Stem Cell Therapy at Adler Footcare Regenerates Cells, Heals Foot Pain

October 29th, 2014 by sandiegodebt No comments »

New York, New York (PRWEB) October 29, 2014

Stem cell therapy is the future of foot pain treatment. New York podiatrists at Adler Footcare are using ethical stem cell treatments for foot problems to help speed healing, minimize pain, and reduce swelling.

Stem cells are cells that havent quite yet determined their role in the body. This gives them the ability to turn into anything. The treatment is being used for problems causing foot pain, such as Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, and arthritis of the first toe joint. Stem cells help regenerate new cartilage and helps tissue heal much quicker.

“Stem cells turn into everything,” said Dr. Jeffrey Adler, Medical/Surgical Director & Owner of Adler Footcare. “So basically, if the damage is due to cartilage, they turn into cartilage. If the damage is due to soft tissue, they turn into soft tissue. Its the Swiss army knife of treatments.”

The stem cells are not live embryos, but instead are generated from the placenta and ethically obtained during the C-sections of live births. The women who the cells are taken from are screened and tested for any communicable diseases beforehand.

Stem cell therapy uses a minimally invasive technique to inject the cells directly into the area where the patient is feeling the foot pain. Fluoroscopy is used to determine the exact position for injection. When stem cell therapy is used healing occurs twice as fast. As the tissues are regenerated and the swelling is minimized, the patient is able to experience more range of motion, less post-operative pain, and less inflammation.

The New York podiatrists at Adler Footcare have been using stem cell therapy for 2 years. They continue to stay up-to-date on the process and have seen only positive results.

To learn more about stem cell treatment for foot pain, contact a New York podiatrist at Adler Footcare.

About Dr. Jeffrey L. Adler

Dr. Jeffrey L. Adler, Medical/Surgical Director and Owner of Adler Footcare of Greater New York has been practicing podiatric medicine since 1979 and has performed thousands of foot and ankle surgeries. Dr. Adler is board certified in Podiatric Surgery and Primary Podiatric Medicine by the American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry. Dr. Adler is also a Professor of Minimally Invasive Foot Surgery for the Academy of Ambulatory Foot and Ankle Surgeons. As one of only several in the country who perform minimally invasive podiatric surgery, Dr. Adlers patients enjoy significantly reduced recovery times.

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The Miracle of Stem Cell Therapy at Adler Footcare Regenerates Cells, Heals Foot Pain

Gene therapy, stem cell therapy trials underway

October 29th, 2014 by PkIqXgNmenNbQciPsWX No comments »

Stem cells and gene hold promising treatment options for Parkinson’s, mandate doctors across the globe, including from Mumbai. Eleven trials to test stem cell and gene therapy for treating Parkinson’s are underway currently of which the one in Mumbai had to be put on hold due to regulatory hurdles.

Currently, neuro-augmentative therapies such as usage of drugs or deep brain stimulation (DBS) are being used to treat Parkinson’s disorder. “The future holds hope for neuro-restorative therapies like that of stem cells or gene infusion in the Parkinson’s disorder treatment. It involves restoration of brain function to normal. In the next five to seven years, this may pave the way for future,” said Dr Paresh Doshi, neurologist at Jaslok Hospital, Peddar Road in Mumbai.

Regulatory hurdles and resource constraints though have led to these trials being held up in Mumbai. Dr Doshi said that trials of Duodopa therapy which involves infusion of an active ingredient gel called Levodopa in the intestines has been kept on hold at the moment at privately-run Jaslok Hospital due to regulatory hurdles. The hospital was the only centre in entire South East Asia to have been running the trial.

“Levodopa gets converted into dopamine in the body. Normal levels of dopamine control Parkinsons disorder,” said Dr Doshi.

Trials to infuse stem cells from the patient’s body in the patient itself had been underway in small group of patients in India, but due to inability to recruit more patients, the trial was stopped. “We could only recruit four patients for two years. However, a similar trial is underway in China and another trial which explores adipose tissue stem cells in treating Parkinson’s disease is underway in South Africa,” said Dr Doshi.

In January this year, medical journal The Lancet reported that after sixteen years of trials, gene therapy is showing promising results in humans. “Three genes that promote the formation of dopamine generating cells in the brain were injected in the brain bound with a viral vector in fifteen patients. The genes are intended to boost the production of dopamine, a chemical that becomes deficient in patients withParkinson’s,” said The Lancet report.

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Gene therapy, stem cell therapy trials underway

Ottawa hosts global leaders in stem cell and regenerative medicine research

October 28th, 2014 by julianauhq No comments »

OTTAWA, Oct. 27, 2014 /CNW/ – Stem cell and regenerative medicine experts representing Canada and international research groups will come together in Ottawa to share some of the leading advances in research, clinical translation and commercialization within the field. The Meetings, co-hosted by the Stem Cell Network and the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine (CCRM), will take …

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Ottawa hosts global leaders in stem cell and regenerative medicine research

Team proposes benchmark to better replicate natural stem cell development in the laboratory environment

October 28th, 2014 by NWRobert No comments »

Oct 27, 2014

In a study that will provide the foundation for scientists to better replicate natural stem cell development in an artificial environment, UCLA researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research led by Dr. Guoping Fan, professor of human genetics, have established a benchmarking standard to assess how culture conditions used to procure stem cells in the lab compare to those found in the human embryo.

The study was published online ahead of print in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are cells that can transform into almost any cell in the human body. Scientists have long cultured PSCs in the laboratory (in vitro) using many different methods and under a variety of conditions. Though it has been known that culture techniques can affect what kind of cells PSCs eventually become, no “gold standard” has yet been established to help scientists determine how the artificial environment can better replicate that found in a natural state (in vivo).

Dr. Kevin Huang, postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Fan and a lead author of the study, analyzed data from multiple existing research studies conducted over the past year. These previously published studies used different culture methods newly developed in vitro in the hopes of coaxing human stem cells into a type of pluripotency that is in a primitive or ground-zero state.

Utilizing recently-published gene expression profiles of human preimplantation embryos as the benchmark to analyze the data, Dr. Huang and colleagues found that culture conditions do affect how genes are expressed in PSCs, and that the newer generation culture methods appear to better resemble those found in the natural environment of developing embryos. This work lays the foundation on the adoption of standardized protocol amongst the scientific community.

“By making an objective assessment of these different laboratory techniques, we found that some may have more of an edge over others in better replicating a natural state,” said Dr. Huang. “When you have culture conditions that more consistently match a non-artificial environment, you have the potential for a much better reflection of what is going on in actual human development.”

With these findings, Dr. Fan’s lab hopes to encourage further investigation into other cell characteristics and molecular markers that determine the effectiveness of culture conditions on the proliferation and self-renewal of PSCs.

“We hope this work will help the research community to reach a consensus to quality-control human pluripotent stem cells,” said Dr. Fan.

Explore further: Technique to make human embryonic stem cells more closely resemble true epiblast cells

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Team proposes benchmark to better replicate natural stem cell development in the laboratory environment

San Diego Stem Cell Clinic, Telehealth, Now Offering Knee Procedures for Cartilage Restoration

October 28th, 2014 by superlearnmathngentot No comments »

San Diego, California (PRWEB) October 28, 2014

The top stem cell clinic in San Diego, Telehealth, is now offering regenerative medicine procedures for the knee to help restore cartilage and avoid the need for joint replacement. The procedures are outpatient and performed by Board Certified doctors at Telehealth. Call (888) 828-4575 for more information and scheduling.

Hundreds of thousands of knee replacements are performed every year in the US, with most being extremely successful. However, it is a major surgery and there is a chance of complications such as infection or blood clot. Therefore, it is advisable to consider a stem cell procedure for the arthritic knee in an effort to delay or avoid the procedure.

Telehealth provides the procedures with several options, including platelet rich plasma therapy, bone marrow or fat derived stem cells, along with amniotic derived procedures. All of the procedures are outpatient and low risk.

In most cases, the procedures are covered in whole or partly by insurance. Telehealth will perform an insurance verification prior to one’s procedure. The Board Certified doctors at the stem cell clinic in San Diego treat patients from a broad area in Southern California. There are several locations including La Jolla, Orange and Upland CA.

In addition to stem cell procedures for knee arthritis, TeleHealth also provides regenerative medicine options for tendon and ligament injuries, sports injuries along with hip, shoulder and ankle arthritis.

For those interested in avoiding knee replacement with a procedure that can potentially preserve or repair arthritic cartilage, call Telehealth at (888) 828-4575 and visit http://stemcelltherapyincalifornia.com/ for more information.

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San Diego Stem Cell Clinic, Telehealth, Now Offering Knee Procedures for Cartilage Restoration

Stem Cell Treatment Clinic, Stem Cell Therapy

October 28th, 2014 by OnenLuntere No comments »

Regenerative Medicine Outpatient Board Certified Stem Cell and PRP Therapy, IV Stem Cell Therapy Program, Prolotherapy.

Musculoskeletal, Neurologic, Parkinsons, Alzheimers, Diabetes Type I and II, COPD, Liver Disease, Cardiac Disease & Cosmetic.

Board Certified Stem Cell Doctors with extensive Regenerative Medicine experience overseeing your care.

The most common questions answered about Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Therapy and how it can help you.

Physican First Choice Treats ALL of these Conditions with Adult Stem Cell Therapy

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Stem Cell Treatment Clinic, Stem Cell Therapy

My Pet World: Stem cell treatments show promise for some feline health issues

October 28th, 2014 by IntaniDah No comments »

Q: You recently wrote about stem cell research, and I understand that stem cell therapy is being used to treat inflammatory bowel disease in cats. Do you have more details?

A: The Winn Feline Foundation has funded the research of Dr. Craig Webb and Dr. Tracy Webb of Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine to study the use of stem cells to treat inflammatory bowel disease in cats. Early results are promising.

Stem cell research in cats doesn’t stop there. Dr. Glenn Olah, president of the Winn Feline Foundation, notes that Winn also funded stem cell studies to treat feline asthma and kidney disease. Results are hopeful, but it’s simply too early to offer definitive answers.

“In some ways, stem cell studies in pets are ahead of (those in) people.”

Q: About a month ago, I adopted a beautiful Burmese after she romanced me at the shelter. Once we got home, she wanted nothing to do with me. It’s not that she isn’t friendly. She loves my son and even sleeps with him. When I get up early to feed her, she stays away until I’ve left the room. My son suggested that the cat harbors resentment toward me because I took her from her cat friends. What can do to improve the situation?

A: “The good news is that it’s very unlikely the cat harbors any resentment,” said Winn Feline board member and feline veterinarian Dr. Drew Weigner, of Atlanta. “The bad news for you — but good news for the cat and your son — is that they developed a fast friendship.

Here are tips that might help the cat warm up to you:

Sit on the floor in an empty room with her. Close the door, but provide an empty box or two for the cat to hop into. Then, simply watch TV, or read a children’s story out loud. Cats sometimes like that soft sing-song voice we tend to use when reading children’s stories.

Wait until the cat comes to you. It may take several days, but eventually curiosity will out.

Next, take over feeding the cat, even if she waits for you to leave the room to eat.

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My Pet World: Stem cell treatments show promise for some feline health issues

Phytoscien Philippines Double Stem Cell Therapy – Video

October 27th, 2014 by brendafingers No comments »



Phytoscien Philippines Double Stem Cell Therapy
Phytoscien Philippines Double Stem Cell Therapy.

By: joel gabo

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Phytoscien Philippines Double Stem Cell Therapy – Video

Stem Cell Therapy for dogs and cats – Bulldog

October 26th, 2014 by may627 No comments »

Dr. R. Kraemer, veterinarian at Grand Pet Care Center, an animal hospital located inSanta Ana Tustin, Orange County, California,has provided veterinary services since 1992 for dog, cat and other pet owners and is now a leading provider for stem cell therapy. Due to increased demand, Dr. Kraemer is expanding the offer for this groundbreaking, regenerative medicine to pet owners from anywhere in the State of California, as well as those out of state who are unable to find Stem Cell treatment/therapy from their local veterinarians.

PDF DOWNLOAD Click Here

Stem Cells are extracted from your pets fatty tissue, and processed with Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) into an injectable solution, which is then activated using LED Light technology. Following activation, the solution is then injected intra-articular (i.e. directly into arthritic joints) as well as intravenously. This is a same day procedure with no serious side effects, no extensive recovery time, or confinement needed.

Economical Quality of Life Enhancement Minimal Confinement Minimal Post-Op Recovery Time No Post-Op Rehabilitation

Promising results currently shown in Clinical trials-Case studies-Peer review-Compassionate use

I sat down for a Q&A with three bulldog rescue members whose pets I have treated with stem cells for various medical conditions. Southern California Bulldog Rescue is a non for profit rescue organization dedicated to providing deserted and abused bulldogs with medical care, housing, and placement with new families. I have a close relationship with SCBR and have been providing medical care for their rescued pets for many years. If you would like to help SCBR and bulldog rescue, we invite you to join our U4B Pledge. SCBR also accepts donations, which are deductible to the full extent of the law.

Vicky (SCBR): Dr. Kraemer what are stem cells?

Dr. Kraemer Answers: Stem cells are the bodys repair cells we all have waiting to be called on when injury occurs and as our body ages (wear & tear). Stem Cells have the ability to divide and differentiate into many different types of cells based on where they are needed throughout the body. Stem cells can divide and turn into tissues such as skin, fat, muscle, bone, cartilage, and nerve, to name a few. They even possess the ability to replicate into organs such as the heart, liver, intestines, pancreas, etc.

Ronnie (SCBR): What the term RegenerativeMedicine means?

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Stem Cell Therapy for dogs and cats – Bulldog

UC San Diego named stem cell 'alpha clinic'

October 26th, 2014 by Evordette No comments »

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

23-Oct-2014

Contact: Scott LaFee slafee@ucsd.edu 619-543-6163 University of California – San Diego @UCSanDiego

In a push to further speed clinical development of emerging stem cell therapies, Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center at UC San Diego Health System was named today one of three new “alpha clinics” by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), the state’s stem cell agency.

The announcement, made at a public meeting in Los Angeles of the CIRM Governing Board, includes an award of $8 million for each of three sites. The other alpha grant recipients are the City of Hope hospital near Los Angeles and University of California, Los Angeles.

“A UC San Diego alpha clinic will provide vital infrastructure for establishing a comprehensive regenerative medicine clinical hub that can support the unusual complexity of first-in-human stem cell-related clinical trials,” said Catriona Jamieson, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine, deputy director of the Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center, director of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center stem cell program and the alpha clinic grant’s principal investigator.

“The designation is essential in much the same manner that comprehensive cancer center status is an assurance of scientific rigor and clinical quality. It will attract patients, funding agencies and study sponsors to participate in, support and accelerate novel stem cell clinical trials and ancillary studies for a range of arduous diseases.”

The alpha clinics are intended to create the long-term, networked infrastructure needed to launch and conduct numerous, extensive clinical trials of stem cell-based drugs and therapies in humans, including some developed by independent California-based investigators and companies. These trials are requisite before any new drug or treatment can be approved for clinical use.

The clinics will also emphasize public education to raise awareness and understanding of stem cell science in part to combat “stem cell tourism” and the marketing of unproven, unregulated and potentially dangerous therapies and help establish sustainable business models for future, approved stem cell treatments.

“Everything we do has one simple goal, to accelerate the development of successful treatments for people in need,” said C. Randal Mills, PhD, CIRM president and CEO. “Stem cell therapies are a new way of treating disease; instead of managing symptoms, cellular medicine has the power to replace or regenerate damaged tissues and organs. And so we need to explore new and innovative ways of accelerating clinical research with stem cells. That is what we hope these alpha stem cell clinics will accomplish.”

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UC San Diego named stem cell 'alpha clinic'

UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center named new 'alpha clinic'

October 26th, 2014 by FrimeFemfit No comments »

In a push to further speed clinical development of emerging stem cell therapies, Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center at UC San Diego Health System was named today one of three new “alpha clinics” by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), the state’s stem cell agency.

The announcement, made at a public meeting in Los Angeles of the CIRM Governing Board, includes an award of $8 million for each of three sites. The other alpha grant recipients are the City of Hope hospital near Los Angeles and University of California, Los Angeles.

“A UC San Diego alpha clinic will provide vital infrastructure for establishing a comprehensive regenerative medicine clinical hub that can support the unusual complexity of first-in-human stem cell-related clinical trials,” said Catriona Jamieson, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine, deputy director of the Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center, director of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center stem cell program and the alpha clinic grant’s principal investigator.

“The designation is essential in much the same manner that comprehensive cancer center status is an assurance of scientific rigor and clinical quality. It will attract patients, funding agencies and study sponsors to participate in, support and accelerate novel stem cell clinical trials and ancillary studies for a range of arduous diseases.”

The alpha clinics are intended to create the long-term, networked infrastructure needed to launch and conduct numerous, extensive clinical trials of stem cell-based drugs and therapies in humans, including some developed by independent California-based investigators and companies. These trials are requisite before any new drug or treatment can be approved for clinical use.

The clinics will also emphasize public education to raise awareness and understanding of stem cell science in part to combat “stem cell tourism” and the marketing of unproven, unregulated and potentially dangerous therapies and help establish sustainable business models for future, approved stem cell treatments.

“Everything we do has one simple goal, to accelerate the development of successful treatments for people in need,” said C. Randal Mills, PhD, CIRM president and CEO. “Stem cell therapies are a new way of treating disease; instead of managing symptoms, cellular medicine has the power to replace or regenerate damaged tissues and organs. And so we need to explore new and innovative ways of accelerating clinical research with stem cells. That is what we hope these alpha stem cell clinics will accomplish.”

The alpha clinic grant reflects continued CIRM support for UC San Diego’s well-established stem cell research and development programs. Since it was created in 2004, CIRM has approved 74 awards totaling almost $156 million to UC San Diego stem cell scientists and programs.

“These alpha clinic awards not only provide valuable support that will help accelerate experimental stem cell therapies into clinical trials, they also bring with them a ‘stamp of approval’ that our center meets important standards set by peers for testing of stem cell therapy trials,” said Lawrence Goldstein, PhD, director of the UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center and of the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program.

Recently, under the auspices of the Sanford Center, UC San Diego researchers and industry collaborators launched three first-in-human clinical trials to pursue unprecedented stem cell-based treatments for spinal cord injuries, Type 1 diabetes and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Other trials for heart failure, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), blindness and other conditions and diseases are in planning stages.

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UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center named new 'alpha clinic'

UCLA Scientists Propose Benchmark to Better Replicate Natural Stem Cell Development in the Laboratory Environment

October 26th, 2014 by Fearlessstaff No comments »

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Newswise In a study that will provide the foundation for scientists to better replicate natural stem cell development in an artificial environment, UCLA researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research led by Dr. Guoping Fan, professor of human genetics, have established a benchmarking standard to assess how culture conditions used to procure stem cells in the lab compare to those found in the human embryo.

The study was published online ahead of print in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are cells that can transform into almost any cell in the human body. Scientists have long cultured PSCs in the laboratory (in vitro) using many different methods and under a variety of conditions. Though it has been known that culture techniques can affect what kind of cells PSCs eventually become, no “gold standard” has yet been established to help scientists determine how the artificial environment can better replicate that found in a natural state (in vivo).

Dr. Kevin Huang, postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Fan and a lead author of the study, analyzed data from multiple existing research studies conducted over the past year. These previously published studies used different culture methods newly developed in vitro in the hopes of coaxing human stem cells into a type of pluripotency that is in a primitive or ground-zero state.

Utilizing recently-published gene expression profiles of human preimplantation embryos as the benchmark to analyze the data, Dr. Huang and colleagues found that culture conditions do affect how genes are expressed in PSCs, and that the newer generation culture methods appear to better resemble those found in the natural environment of developing embryos. This work lays the foundation on the adoption of standardized protocol amongst the scientific community.

“By making an objective assessment of these different laboratory techniques, we found that some may have more of an edge over others in better replicating a natural state,” said Dr. Huang. “When you have culture conditions that more consistently match a non-artificial environment, you have the potential for a much better reflection of what is going on in actual human development.”

With these findings, Dr. Fan’s lab hopes to encourage further investigation into other cell characteristics and molecular markers that determine the effectiveness of culture conditions on the proliferation and self-renewal of PSCs.

“We hope this work will help the research community to reach a consensus to quality-control human pluripotent stem cells,” said Dr. Fan.

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UCLA Scientists Propose Benchmark to Better Replicate Natural Stem Cell Development in the Laboratory Environment

Tuffy stem cell therapy patient – Video

October 26th, 2014 by Royakeactioky No comments »



Tuffy stem cell therapy patient
Tuffy 2 months after he received Stem Cell Therapy here. He is running around now like nothing happened. I can not believe he was hit by a car and broke his back in 2 places just 2 months ago.

By: Noel Berger

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Tuffy stem cell therapy patient – Video

Stem Cell Therapy Help Buddy the Beagle – Video

October 26th, 2014 by Juliafedrsts No comments »



Stem Cell Therapy Help Buddy the Beagle
Buddy the beagle wasn't able to walk when he first arrived at the University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center. With the help of the Veterinary Medical …

By: UMN Health

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Stem Cell Therapy Help Buddy the Beagle – Video