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Research and Markets: Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis (RMS) – Pipeline Review, H2 2014

December 21st, 2014 by jock7ov No comments »

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Research and Markets: Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis (RMS) – Pipeline Review, H2 2014

Multiple sclerosis support group holds regular meetings

December 21st, 2014 by Esconsneerb No comments »

The website for everything about pets in Downriver. Downriver’s many animal shelters, rescue group and adoption agencies share in maintaining this site.

Macomb Daily staff writer Amanda Lee gives her take on movies, music, television, technology, games, sports and even soap operas.

Mike Ptak blogs about all things outdoors Downriver.

As The News-Herald Newspapers’ Downriver Life editor, I cover all things arts and entertainment. Personally, I have a penchant for theater so I’ll showcase the latest happenings on the stage, both Downriver and in downtown Detroit, in this blog. Break a leg!

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Multiple sclerosis support group holds regular meetings

BUSINESS WIRE: Data from Biogen Idecs Portfolio of Multiple Sclerosis Therapies and Pipeline Featured at Medical …

December 21st, 2014 by Bobactho No comments »

MITTEILUNG UEBERMITTELT VON BUSINESS WIRE. FUER DEN INHALT IST ALLEIN DAS BERICHTENDE UNTERNEHMEN VERANTWORTLICH.

-Scientific Presentations Showcase InnovativeMS Medicines and Experimental Therapies-

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. –(BUSINESS WIRE)– 30.05.2014 —

Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) today announced that more than 60 company-sponsored presentations highlighting key data from its industry-leading portfolio of marketed and investigational multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies are being featured during two neurology conferences, further demonstrating its commitment to meeting the individual needs of MS patients and improving outcomes with research that addresses important efficacy and safety questions.

Data are being presented during the annual meeting of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC) and the Sixth Cooperative Meeting with Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS; May 28 May 31 in Dallas, Texas); and the Joint Congress of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) and European Neurological Society (ENS; May 31 June 3 in Istanbul, Turkey).

Our research and development efforts over the past 30 years have positioned Biogen Idec at the forefront of MS innovation, and the scope of data we are presenting at CMSC/ACTRIMS and EFNS/ENS underscores our commitment to improving the lives of people living with MS, said Katherine Dawson, M.D., vice president, global medical neurology at Biogen Idec. Beyond discovering new treatments, we are also focused on innovating across the spectrum of MS care, investigating different approaches to advancing disease management.

The data at CMSC/ACTRIMS and EFNS/ENS include results from studies of Biogen Idecs currently marketed products TECFIDERA (dimethyl fumarate), TYSABRI (natalizumab), AVONEX (interferon beta-1a) and FAMPYRA (prolonged-release fampridine tablets) in markets outside of the U.S. as well as findings from the clinical programs of its MS pipeline candidates PLEGRIDY (peginterferon beta-1a), daclizumab high-yield process ([DAC HYP], EFNS/ENS presentation only) and Anti-LINGO-1 ([BIIB033], EFNS/ENS presentation only).

Details and Biogen Idec data presentations listings for the 2014 annual CMSC/ACTRIMS Meeting and 2014 Joint Congress of the EFNS and ENS can be found by visiting:

About Biogen Idec

Through cutting-edge science and medicine, Biogen Idec discovers, develops and delivers to patients worldwide innovative therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, hemophilia and autoimmune disorders. Founded in 1978, Biogen Idec is the worlds oldest independent biotechnology company. Patients worldwide benefit from its leading multiple sclerosis therapies. For product labeling, press releases and additional information about the Company, please visit http://www.biogenidec.com.

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BUSINESS WIRE: Data from Biogen Idecs Portfolio of Multiple Sclerosis Therapies and Pipeline Featured at Medical …

BUSINESS WIRE: Biogen Idec Announces Official Partnership with Sailing Sclerosis Oceans of Hope to Globally Change …

December 21st, 2014 by AlexComarinoso No comments »

MITTEILUNG UEBERMITTELT VON BUSINESS WIRE. FUER DEN INHALT IST ALLEIN DAS BERICHTENDE UNTERNEHMEN VERANTWORTLICH.

– Global Project Uses Sailing to Empower People Living with Multiple Sclerosis –

ZUG, Switzerland –(BUSINESS WIRE)– 28.05.2014 —

In celebration of World MS Day and as part of its ongoing mission to support those living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) globally, Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) announced that it has joined the Sailing Sclerosis Foundations (SSF) Oceans of Hope project as principal sponsor and official partner. This multi-year, global campaign is designed to use sailing as a means to educate and empower the MS community, changing perceptions of what it means to live with the disease and demonstrating the benefits of an active lifestyle.

The Oceans of Hope project was pioneered by Dr. Mikkel Anthonisen, Founder of SSF and a MS specialist at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet. He and several other crew members, including some living with MS, will sail around the world, building strong bonds with the global MS community.

We are proud to be a part of the Oceans of Hope project, which fits perfectly with our more than three decade commitment to supporting the MS community through innovative science and patient programs, said David Allsop, senior vice president, Europe and Canada for Biogen Idec. Treatment of MS needs to be holistic incorporating the right therapies with community programs and resources. Through its message of empowerment, we believe that Oceans of Hope can benefit thousands of patients around the world.

The campaign will kick off today in Copenhagen, Denmark with the official naming of the boat. It will officially launch from Copenhagen on June 15, after which the boat will stop in multiple harbors in Europe, North America, South America, and Australia. Each port day will be celebrated with an interactive event, giving people living with MS the opportunity to learn to sail and participate as crew members.

“We are delighted to partner with Biogen Idec. Oceans of Hope aims to change perceptions of MS by showing what is possible when people with a chronic disease are empowered to conquer their individual challenges, said Dr. Anthonisen. As a physician, I see that each person who has MS is unique and needs access to different resources to treat their individual disease. The voyage will also carry this year’s World MS Day theme of access across the globe, building stronger bonds across the global MS and sailing communities.”

For more information about Oceans of Hope and SSF, where the boat will stop, or how to participate in the program, please visit: http://www.sailingsclerosis.com. The boats voyage can be followed via SSF social media either via Twitter @sailsclerosis, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/OceansofHope, and Instagram at OceansofHope.

About Multiple Sclerosis

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BUSINESS WIRE: Biogen Idec Announces Official Partnership with Sailing Sclerosis Oceans of Hope to Globally Change …

Darien resident receives award

December 21st, 2014 by AttatoAnarcex No comments »

DARIEN Darien resident Sean Gallagher was honored with a Norman Cohn Hope Award in December by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Greater Illinois Chapter, according to a news release.

The award is named for Norman Cohn, who supported efforts to end multiple sclerosis, a disease that affects the body’s central nervous system.

Gallagher has served as chair of the society’s Greater Illinois Chapter for three years and has been a board member for the past decade, according to the organization. Under his leadership, the chapter broke fundraising records, resulting in a 27 percent fundraising grow between 2013 and 2014.

Gallagher’s term as chair of the chapter’s board will end Feb. 4, but he will continue to work with the board as vice chair, according to the release.

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Darien resident receives award

Stem Cell Therapy in Pune | Stem Cell Treatment | Inamdar …

December 20th, 2014 by VemVippilegam No comments »

The potential of SCs to replace dead or damaged cells in any tissue of the body heralds the advent of a new field of medicine that is delivering cures for diseases now thought to be untreatable

Stem cell therapy represents a promising avenue for the treatment of disorders like

Q1: What are stem cells? Answer: Stem cells are class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialized cell types .They have the unique properties of self renewal and differentiation. Differentiation property of stem cells help them to form another type of cell with more specialized function such as brain cell, red blood cell or muscle cell and also the entire organ. During the foetal development, cells divide, migrate, specialize and form the organ. After birth, stem cells are also present in bone marrow which can be used to treat various diseases.

Q2: Which disorders can be treated using Stem Cells? Answer: Currently stem cells are being used successfully to treat various (disorders) diseases like Cerebral palsy, Spinal Cord Injury, Traumatic brain injury, Paralysis, Brain Stroke Osteoarthritis, Autism etc. Apart from this, stem cells can be used to treat liver disorders and Diabetes.

Q3: How is Stem Cell Therapy carried out? Answer: Stem Cell therapy is a very simple and painless process.Mesenchymal stem cells are injected directly into the synivial fluid in the knee. The whole process is carried out very carefully under sterile conditions.

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Stem Cell Therapy in Pune | Stem Cell Treatment | Inamdar …

First stem-cell therapy approved for medical use in Europe

December 19th, 2014 by Sakovake No comments »

This treatment will only be allowed under carefully defined conditions, however, so that the outcomes can be carefully monitored to see if the treatment works and doesnt have any unexpected side-effects.

Stem cells can act as a repair system for the body.

Limbal stem cells are located in the eye at the border between the cornea the clear front part of the eye – and the sclera the white of the eye.

Physical or chemical burns can cause loss of these stem cells, resulting in limbal stem cell deficiency, LSCD, a condition that is estimated to affect about 3.3 out of 100,000 people in the European Union and around 650 people in Britain.

Symptoms include pain, sensitivity to light, inflammation, excessive blood vessel growth, clouding of the cornea, and eventually blindness.

In LSCD the limbal stem cells become so diminished that they eyes can no longer make new cells to repair damage.

The new treatment takes a small sample of the patients healthy cornea, removes the stem cells and grows them until there are sufficient numbers to put back into the eye. The cells themselves then repair the damage.

Moorfields Eye Hospital in London has successfully treated around 20 people with Holocar so far in trials.

Prof Chris Mason, from University College London, told the BBC: “This move would enable far more people to access it, you could now prescribe this.”

The EMA decision to approve Holoclar will now be sent to the European Commission for market authorization. It will then be up to Nice to decide whether to approve the therapy for use on the NHS.

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First stem-cell therapy approved for medical use in Europe

EU approves first stem cell therapy

December 19th, 2014 by sdbankruptcy No comments »

A stem cell therapy has been approved for widespread medical use in the EU for the first time.

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EU approves first stem cell therapy

California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)

December 19th, 2014 by AbrabSwarlY No comments »

Makes grants and provides loans for stem cell research, facilities and other opportunities, managed from San Francisco.

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California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)

Introducton to Stem Cell Therapy by Harry Adelson, N.D. – Video

December 19th, 2014 by Unammandy No comments »



Introducton to Stem Cell Therapy by Harry Adelson, N.D.

By: Harry Adelson, N.D.

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Introducton to Stem Cell Therapy by Harry Adelson, N.D. – Video

Okyanos Expands World-Class Cell Therapy Medical Team

December 19th, 2014 by Thealayviesia No comments »

Freeport, Grand Bahama (PRWEB) December 18, 2014

Okyanos, the leader in cell therapy, announced the expansion of its medical team to accommodate the growing demand for cell therapy to treat patients with chronic unmet needs for which adult stem cell therapy using cells from a persons own fat (adipose) tissue has been found to be safe and efficacious. Led by a prestigious team of U.S.-licensed physicians and nursing staff, the team includes Dr. Todd Malan, Chief Cell Therapy Officer and pioneer of adipose-derived stem cell therapy, and is joined by Dr. Matthew Mick, Cardiologist, FACC, Fellowship at Cleveland Clinic.

We are very pleased to have such a competent and highly regarded aggregate of expertise, said Okyanos CEO Matt Feshbach. Our team is comprised of leaders in their respective fields, each of whom is committed to bringing about a new standard of care and better quality of life to our patients.

Todd Malan, MD, serves as the Chief Cell Therapy Officer and General Surgeon at Okyanos, overseeing the fat-harvesting and stem cell isolation step of the Okyanos cell therapy process. A pioneer of fat-derived stem cell therapies, he became the first physician in the U.S. to utilize stem cells from fat for soft tissue reconstruction in October 2009, combining water-assisted fat-harvesting, fat transfer and adult stem cell technologies.

Matthew J. Mick, MD, is a triple board-certified interventional cardiologist. After attending the Indiana University School of Medicine, Dr. Mick completed his Cardiovascular Disease and Interventional Fellowships at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Dr. Mick participated as Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator in more than 20 cardiac clinical trials. He was a leader in developing trans-radial cardiac catheterization and holds several patents for cardiac catheters. Dr. Mick has performed over 15,000 diagnostic procedures in his 22 years of practice.

As the Director of Nursing managing a medical team which now numbers 10, Gretchen Dezelick oversees all of the clinical operations and maintains the superior cleanliness and safety standards that help make Okyanos a center of excellence. With more than 25 years of nursing experience progressing from bedside nursing to administrative and management positions in a variety of healthcare settings, Gretchen was a Certified Critical Care Nurse (CCRN) for more than 20 years and has been a Certified Peri-Operative Nurse (CNOR) for more than three years as well as being a Licensed Health Care Risk Manager (LHCRM).

Okyanos is also very proud to include several Bahamian medical staff such as Anesthesiologist Dr. Vincent Burton, Fellow of the Royal College of Anaesthetists, UK (FRCA), a Certified Critical Care Nurse, cardiology tech, sonographer, surgical scrub tech and a facilities tech, to deliver well-rounded expert patient care. The team also includes a Certified Cardiovascular Nurse, a BSN RN and a cardiovascular tech, providing more than 88 years of combined experience.

Okyanos follows the treatment guidelines laid out in clinical trials such as PRECISE and others which have demonstrated positive results from adult stem cell therapy. Okyanos cell therapy is performed in their newly constructed surgery center built to U.S. surgical standards and which also includes a state-of-the-art Phillips cath lab.

Adult stem cell therapy has emerged as a new treatment alternative for those who are restricted in activities they can no longer do but are determined to live a more normal life. Okyanos cell therapy uses a unique blend of adult stem cells derived from a patients own fat tissue, thereby helping the bodys own natural biology to heal itself.

Just 50 miles from US shore, Okyanos cell therapy is available to patients with severe heart disease including coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) as well as patients with autoimmune diseases, tissue ischemia, neurological and orthopedic conditions.

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Okyanos Expands World-Class Cell Therapy Medical Team

Pre and Post Stem Cell Therapy – Video

December 18th, 2014 by ldgjqzujtpq No comments »



Pre and Post Stem Cell Therapy
Russell Scott was a top cyclist for the 7-11 team. He was diagnosed with MS in 1991. After every traditional FDA approved drug he decided to try stem cell therapy. He has been on a steady…

By: Teresa Scott

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Pre and Post Stem Cell Therapy – Video

Cutting Out the Cellular Middleman: New Technology Directly Reprograms Skin Fibroblasts For a New Role

December 17th, 2014 by Lestai No comments »

PHILADELPHIA As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body’s pigment-producing cells. The technique has immediate and important implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin diseases such as vitiligo, as well as new screening strategies for melanoma. The work was published this week in Nature Communications.

The new technique cuts out a cellular middleman. Study senior author Xiaowei George Xu, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, explains, “Through direct reprogramming, we do not have to go through the pluripotent stem cell stage, but directly convert fibroblasts to melanocytes. So these cells do not have tumorigenicity.”

Changing a cell from one type to another is hardly unusual. Nature does it all the time, most notably as cells divide and differentiate themselves into various types as an organism grows from an embryo into a fully-functional being. With stem cell therapies, medicine is learning how to tap into such cell specialization for new clinical treatments. But controlling and directing the process is challenging. It is difficult to identify the specific transcription factors needed to create a desired cell type. Also, the necessary process of first changing a cell into an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) capable of differentiation, and then into the desired type, can inadvertently create tumors.

Xu and his colleagues began by conducting an extensive literature search to identify 10 specific cell transcription factors important for melanocyte development. They then performed a transcription factor screening assay and found three transcription factors out of those 10 that are required for melanocytes: SOX10, MITF, and PAX3, a combination dubbed SMP3.

“We did a huge amount of work,” says Xu. “We eliminated all the combinations of the other transcription factors and found that these three are essential.”

The researchers first tested the SMP3 combination in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which then quickly displayed melanocytic markers. Their next step used a human-derived SMP3 combination in human fetal dermal cells, and again melanocytes (human-induced melanocytes, or hiMels) rapidly appeared. Further testing confirmed that these hiMels indeed functioned as normal melanocytes, not only in cell culture but also in whole animals, using a hair-patch assay, in which the hiMels generated melanin pigment. The hiMels proved to be functionally identical in every respect to normal melanocytes.

Xu and his colleagues anticipate using their new technique in the treatment of a wide variety of skin diseases, particularly those such as vitiligo for which cell-based therapies are the best and most efficient approach.

The method could also provide a new way to study melanoma. By generating melanocytes from the fibroblasts of melanoma patients, Xu explains, “we can screen not only to find why these patients easily develop melanoma, but possibly use their cells to screen for small compounds that can prevent melanoma from happening.”

Perhaps most significantly, say the researchers, is the far greater number of fibroblasts available in the body for reprogramming compared to tissue-specific adult stem cells, which makes this new technique well-suited for other cell-based treatments.

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01-AR054593, P30-AR057217)

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Cutting Out the Cellular Middleman: New Technology Directly Reprograms Skin Fibroblasts For a New Role

Cell biologists discover on-off switch for key stem cell gene

December 16th, 2014 by Evetswearovew No comments »

Consider the relationship between an air traffic controller and a pilot. The pilot gets the passengers to their destination, but the air traffic controller decides when the plane can take off and when it must wait. The same relationship plays out at the cellular level in animals, including humans. A region of an animal’s genome — the controller — directs when a particular gene — the pilot — can perform its prescribed function.

A new study by cell and systems biologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) investigating stem cells in mice shows, for the first time, an instance of such a relationship between the Sox2 gene which is critical for early development, and a region elsewhere on the genome that effectively regulates its activity. The discovery could mean a significant advance in the emerging field of human regenerative medicine, as the Sox2 gene is essential for maintaining embryonic stem cells that can develop into any cell type of a mature animal.

“We studied how the Sox2 gene is turned on in mice, and found the region of the genome that is needed to turn the gene on in embryonic stem cells,” said Professor Jennifer Mitchell of U of T’s Department of Cell and Systems Biology, lead invesigator of a study published in the December 15 issue of Genes & Development.

“Like the gene itself, this region of the genome enables these stem cells to maintain their ability to become any type of cell, a property known as pluripotency. We named the region of the genome that we discovered the Sox2 control region, or SCR,” said Mitchell.

Since the sequencing of the human genome was completed in 2003, researchers have been trying to figure out which parts of the genome made some people more likely to develop certain diseases. They have found that the answers are more often in the regions of the human genome that turn genes on and off.

“If we want to understand how genes are turned on and off, we need to know where the sequences that perform this function are located in the genome,” said Mitchell. “The parts of the human genome linked to complex diseases such as heart disease, cancer and neurological disorders can often be far away from the genes they regulate, so it can be dificult to figure out which gene is being affected and ultimately causing the disease.”

It was previously thought that regions much closer to the Sox2 gene were the ones that turned it on in embryonic stem cells. Mitchell and her colleagues eliminated this possibility when they deleted these nearby regions in the genome of mice and found there was no impact on the gene’s ability to be turned on in embryonic stem cells.

“We then focused on the region we’ve since named the SCR as my work had shown that it can contact the Sox2 gene from its location 100,000 base pairs away,” said study lead author Harry Zhou, a former graduate student in Mitchell’s lab, now a student at U of T’s Faculty of Medicine. “To contact the gene, the DNA makes a loop that brings the SCR close to the gene itself only in embryonic stem cells. Once we had a good idea that this region could be acting on the Sox2 gene, we removed the region from the genome and monitored the effect on Sox2.”

The researchers discovered that this region is required to both turn Sox2 on, and for the embryonic stem cells to maintain their characteristic appearance and ability to differentiate into all the cell types of the adult organism.

“Just as deletion of the Sox2 gene causes the very early embryo to die, it is likely that an abnormality in the regulatory region would also cause early embryonic death before any of the organs have even formed,” said Mitchell. “It is possible that the formation of the loop needed to make contact with the Sox2 gene is an important final step in the process by which researchers practicing regenerative medicine can generate pluripotent cells from adult cells.”

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Cell biologists discover on-off switch for key stem cell gene

New Technology Directly Reprograms Skin Fibroblasts For a New Role

December 16th, 2014 by Dralman No comments »

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Newswise PHILADELPHIA – As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body’s pigment-producing cells. The technique has immediate and important implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin diseases such as vitiligo, as well as new screening strategies for melanoma. The work was published this week in Nature Communications.

The new technique cuts out a cellular middleman. Study senior author Xiaowei George Xu, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, explains, “Through direct reprogramming, we do not have to go through the pluripotent stem cell stage, but directly convert fibroblasts to melanocytes. So these cells do not have tumorigenicity.”

Changing a cell from one type to another is hardly unusual. Nature does it all the time, most notably as cells divide and differentiate themselves into various types as an organism grows from an embryo into a fully-functional being. With stem cell therapies, medicine is learning how to tap into such cell specialization for new clinical treatments. But controlling and directing the process is challenging. It is difficult to identify the specific transcription factors needed to create a desired cell type. Also, the necessary process of first changing a cell into an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) capable of differentiation, and then into the desired type, can inadvertently create tumors.

Xu and his colleagues began by conducting an extensive literature search to identify 10 specific cell transcription factors important for melanocyte development. They then performed a transcription factor screening assay and found three transcription factors out of those 10 that are required for melanocytes: SOX10, MITF, and PAX3, a combination dubbed SMP3.

“We did a huge amount of work,” says Xu. “We eliminated all the combinations of the other transcription factors and found that these three are essential.”

The researchers first tested the SMP3 combination in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which then quickly displayed melanocytic markers. Their next step used a human-derived SMP3 combination in human fetal dermal cells, and again melanocytes (human-induced melanocytes, or hiMels) rapidly appeared. Further testing confirmed that these hiMels indeed functioned as normal melanocytes, not only in cell culture but also in whole animals, using a hair-patch assay, in which the hiMels generated melanin pigment. The hiMels proved to be functionally identical in every respect to normal melanocytes.

Xu and his colleagues anticipate using their new technique in the treatment of a wide variety of skin diseases, particularly those such as vitiligo for which cell-based therapies are the best and most efficient approach.

The method could also provide a new way to study melanoma. By generating melanocytes from the fibroblasts of melanoma patients, Xu explains, “we can screen not only to find why these patients easily develop melanoma, but possibly use their cells to screen for small compounds that can prevent melanoma from happening.”

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New Technology Directly Reprograms Skin Fibroblasts For a New Role

Discovery of stem cell gene switch brings regenerative medicine closer to reality

December 16th, 2014 by Magortro No comments »

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Discovery of stem cell gene switch brings regenerative medicine closer to reality

BUSINESS WIRE: The 1st Meeting of the Series Bridging Biomedical Worlds: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities for …

December 14th, 2014 by jyBZBQJaflzPbgvUDQ No comments »

MITTEILUNG UEBERMITTELT VON BUSINESS WIRE. FUER DEN INHALT IST ALLEIN DAS BERICHTENDE UNTERNEHMEN VERANTWORTLICH.

PARIS –(BUSINESS WIRE)– 13.10.2014 —

Stem cells hold great promise for treating a variety of human diseases and injuries. Basic and translational stem cell research is among the most competitive fields in the life sciences. We have co-organized the first Bridging Biomedical Worlds conference of our new series of international scientific meetings: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities for Stem Cell Therapy.

The goal of this conference is to promote progress in the translation of basic stem cell research into stem cell therapies. To do this, presentations will highlight diverse areas of on-going stem cell biology research. In addition, panelists will discuss obstacles to translation and the associated risks and ethical controversies. These panels will provide a means to accelerate communication and cooperation among researchers, bioengineers, clinicians and industry scientists, and will explore ways to implement international policies, regulations and guidelines to ensure the development of safe and effective stem cell therapies worldwide. Participants will hear about the latest basic and translational stem cell research from more than 20 distinguished speakers from China, Japan, Europe and theUnited States.

This conference held in Beijing, China, October 13-15, 2014 is co-organized by the Fondation IPSEN, AAAS/Science and AAAS/Science Translational Medicine, in association withFred Gage (Salk Institute for Biological Studies) and Qi Zhou (Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences).

About AAAS/Science The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the worlds largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science (www.sciencemag.org) as well as Science Translational Medicine (www.sciencetranslationalmedicine.org) and Science Signaling (www.sciencesignaling.org). AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes some 261 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals.Sciencehas the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of 1 million. The non-profit AAAS (www.aaas.org) is open to all and fulfills its mission to advance science and serve society not only by publishing the very best scientific research but also through initiatives in science policy, international programs and science education. http://www.sciencemag.org

About AAAS/Science Translational Medicine Science Translational Medicine, launched in October 2009, is the newest journal published by AAAS/Science. The goal of Science Translational Medicineis to promote human health by providing a forum for communicating the latest biomedical research findings from basic, translational, and clinical researchers from all established and emerging disciplines relevant to medicine. Despite 50 years of advances in our fundamental understanding of human biology and the emergence of powerful new technologies, the translation of this knowledge into effective new treatments and health measures has been slow. This paradox illustrates the daunting complexity of the challenges faced by translational researchers as they apply the basic discoveries and experimental approaches of modern science to the alleviation of human suffering. A major goal ofScience Translational Medicineis to publish papers that identify and fill the scientific knowledge gaps at the junction of basic research and medical application in order to accelerate the translation of scientific knowledge into new methods for preventing, diagnosing and treating human disease. http://www.sciencetranslationalmedicine.org

About the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Zoology (IOZ), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), is one of the leading research institutions in China. The institute consists of 76 professors (including 2 members of Chinese Academy of Sciences), 3 state key research laboratories and 1 zoological museum. The major research areas of IOZ include animal sciences, cell membrane biology, stem cells and reproduction. The stem cell research teams of IOZ include over 10 PIs, and they mainly focus on questions related to the establishment of pluripotent stem cell lines, neural stem cell induction and regeneration, mechanism studies of pluripotency and differentiation regulation of embryonic stem cells, animal model establishment and functional studies, etc. The major achievements in the field of stem cell research made by IOZ faculties include: obtained the first healthy animal (Xiaoxiao the mouse) using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via tetraploid complementation method, identified molecular markers for the evaluation of pluripotency levels of stem cells and the related regulatory mechanisms, achieved cell fate conversion across different germ layers, established various types of human and mouse embryonic stem cell lines, as well as the Beijing Stem Cell Bank, etc. These achievements has once been selected as one of the TIMES Top 10 Medical Breakthroughs in 2009, and twice been selected as Top 10 Breakthroughs in Science and Technology in China. The Beijing Stem Cell Bank now functions as a resource for stem cell and regenerative medicine studies, providing various types of embryonic stem cell lines, adult stem cell lines and somatic cell lines for many research groups. IOZ also hosts modern animal model research centers for pigs and monkeys, which have generated a few valuable animal models for disease mechanism studies and pharmaceutical researches. http://www.english.ioz.cas.cn

About the Fondation Ipsen Established in 1983 under the aegis of the Fondation de France, the mission of the Fondation Ipsen is to contribute to the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The long-standing action of the Fondation Ipsen aims at fostering the interaction between researchers and clinical practitioners, which is essential due to the extreme specialization of these professions. The ambition of the Fondation Ipsen is to initiate a reflection about the major scientific issues of the forthcoming years. It has developed an important international network of scientific experts who meet regularly at meetings known as Colloques Mdecine et Recherche, dedicated to five main themes: Alzheimer’s disease, neurosciences, longevity, endocrinology and cancer science. Moreover the Fondation Ipsen has started since 2007 several meetings in partnership with the Salk Institute, the Karolinska Institutet, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Days of Molecular Medicine Global Foundation as well as with the science journals Nature, Cell and Science. The Fondation Ipsen has published over one hundred books and has awarded more than 250 prizes and research grants. http://www.fondation-ipsen.org

Fondation Ipsen For further information, please contact: Isabelle de Segonzac, Image Sept E-mail : isegonzac@image7.fr Tel. : +33 (0)1 53 70 74 70

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BUSINESS WIRE: The 1st Meeting of the Series Bridging Biomedical Worlds: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities for …

Dallas, Tx | SVF Stem Cell Therapy Testimonial (Knee Replacement Alternative) – Video

December 13th, 2014 by JatVedascoste No comments »



Dallas, Tx | SVF Stem Cell Therapy Testimonial (Knee Replacement Alternative)
http://www.innovationsStemCellCenter.com Call: 214.420.7970 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/innovationsmedical Twitter: https://twitter.com/dallasdrj Inst…

By: dallasdrj

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Dallas, Tx | SVF Stem Cell Therapy Testimonial (Knee Replacement Alternative) – Video

Sally’s Stem Cell Therapy for Early Dementia #9 – Video

December 12th, 2014 by dernixzw No comments »



Sally's Stem Cell Therapy for Early Dementia #9
First video: https://youtu.be/y9AKaF7QdjU Last video before she returned to the UK.

By: Sally Dympna

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Sally’s Stem Cell Therapy for Early Dementia #9 – Video

Canadian-led team of researchers shows how stem cells can be reprogrammed

December 11th, 2014 by TiliGalry No comments »

TORONTO A Canadian-led international team of researchers has begun solving the mystery of just how a specialized cell taken from a persons skin is reprogrammed into an embryonic-like stem cell, from which virtually any other cell type in the body can be generated.

The research is being touted as a breakthrough in regenerative medicine that will allow scientists to one day harness stem cells to treat or even cure a host of conditions, from blindness and Parkinsons disease to diabetes and spinal cord injuries.

Besides creating the reprogramming roadmap, the scientists also identified a new type of stem cell, called an F-class stem cell due to its fuzzy appearance. Their work is detailed in five papers published Wednesday in the prestigious journals Nature and Nature Communications.

Dr. Andras Nagy, a senior scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, led the team of 50 researchers from Canada, the Netherlands, South Korea and Australia, which spent four years analyzing and cataloguing the day-by-day process that occurs in stem cell reprogramming.

The work builds on the 2006-2007 papers by Shinya Yamanaka, who showed that adult skin cells could be turned into embryonic-like, or pluripotent, stem cells through genetic manipulation, a discovery that garnered the Japanese scientist the Nobel Prize in 2012.

Nagy likened the roughly 21-day process to complete that transformation to a black box, so called because scientists did not know what went on within the cells as they morphed from one cell type into the other.

It was just like a black box, Nagy said Wednesday, following a briefing at the hospital. You start with a skin cell, you arrive at a stem cell but we had no idea what was happening inside the cell.

Nagys team set about cataloguing the changes as they occurred by removing cells from culture dishes at set points during the three-week period, then analyzing such cellular material as DNA and proteins present at that moment.

The result is a database that will be available to scientists around the world, which the team hopes will spur new research to advance the field of stem cell-based regenerative medicine.

Co-author Ian Rogers, a scientist in Nagys lab, said the database will allow researchers to identify various properties of the developing stem cells, which could mean improving their ability to treat or cure disease.

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Canadian-led team of researchers shows how stem cells can be reprogrammed